Conference By Track

KEYNOTES

Monday, December 6, 2021  |  8:30 AM - 9:45 AM

Welcoming Ceremony and Opening Keynote With Alan Graham

SPEAKERS
 
Alan Graham
Founder and CEO, Mobile Loaves & Fishes

Join us for our welcome ceremonies to kick off your 2021 Symposium!  Stay for our opening keynote with Alan Graham, Founder and CEO, of Mobile Loaves & Fishes. 

 

Mobile Loaves & Fishes is a social outreach ministry committed to providing permanent, sustainable solutions for the chronically homeless while surrounding them with compassion, love and dignity. Those who know Alan best know that he is a man on a mission — to relieve the struggles homeless individuals face in obtaining their basic needs of food, community and a place to call home.

 

Since its founding in 1998, Mobile Loaves & Fishes volunteers have served more than 5 million meals
with a side of hope to homeless men and women living on the streets of Austin. The organization has
also spawned similar food truck ministries in other cities across the U.S. With the support of more than
19,000 volunteers, Mobile Loaves & Fishes is the largest prepared feeding program to the homeless and
working poor in Austin, Texas. Graham is also the visionary behind MLF’s Community First! Village — a
27-acre master planned development that provides affordable, permanent housing and a supporting
community to the chronically homeless in Central Texas.

 

Sponsored By:

 

 

 

KEYNOTES

Tuesday, December 7, 2021  |  9:15 AM - 10:30 AM

Keynote: Redesigning the Future of Health Care Delivery

SPEAKERS
 
Meghan Nechrebecki, MSPH
Founder and CEO, Health Care Transformation

Hear from keynote speaker, Meghan Nechrebecki, CEO of Health Care Transformation and former Tedx speaker, as she inspires us all to think differently about the future of health care delivery. Meghan will discuss how health care is drastically shifting to digitize, optimize, and improve outcomes and experience for patients, clinicians, and administration.

 

Sponsored By:

KEYNOTES

Wednesday, December 8, 2021  |  11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

Keynote: Design and build your new hospital for half the cost and have fun while doing it!

SPEAKERS
 
Bruce Komiske, MHA, FACHE
Owner, Komiske Consulting LLC

Learn from four major new hospital projects how to integrate project management with philanthropy to create world class facilities while saving a minimum of 50% of the conventional cost.

During our closing keynote you will learn the following:

  • Engage patients, families, staff, donors, and all other stakeholders in all facets of the project to create an award-winning project unique to your specific community that maximizes philanthropic support.
  • Establish a bold vision at the start of the project, no matter what the size, to create a shared experience of excitement and success.
  • Start with ‘friend raising’ and then fund-raising to achieve the ultimate philanthropic goal.
  • Engage with your donors (school groups to billionaires) to enhance both the project design as well as achieving the campaign goal and the overall project success.

Sponsored By:

 

 

ROOM A
Monday, December 6
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

A01: Breaking New Ground in Comprehensive Care for Mentally Ill Children

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Ed Cheshire, RA, NCARB
Senior Project Manager, Nationwide Children's Hospital
 
Ryan Hullinger, AIA, NCARB
Partner, NBBJ

The Big Lots Pavilion at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio represents one of the most consequential investments in mental health services the last 10 years. Designed to accommodate over 100 inpatient beds in a variety of settings and a wide array of crisis, respite and outpatient services, the building represents a commitment to a complex and diverse array of clinical treatment options and settings with a focus on prevention and early diagnosis and treatment of mental illness. Our presentation will provide an overview of the project and will then focus on four areas where the building embodies some of the most advanced thinking in terms of clinical practice and the design of mental health facilities: 

  • Mental Health Assessment and Crisis Services
  • Care Environments for Children with Co-morbid Mental Illness and Intellectual Disabilities and Autism 
  • Ambulatory, Research and Bridging Services
  • Embracing an Urban Medical Center Setting

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understand the current thinking in planning and design of a new project type: a comprehensive community-based care system for the mentally ill.
2. Learn about emerging facility standards for crisis care in the context of one of the most diversely provisioned settings for crisis and bridging care.
3. Learn about how to accommodate bridging services for the mentally ill in the context of a flexible research and ambulatory care platform.
4. Learn about the environmental accommodations that are helpful for the care of children with co-morbid mental illness and autism.

11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

A02: Tackling Everyday ICU design while preparing for infectious disease needs

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Kirsten Miller
Architect, GBBN Architects
Angela Powell, PE, MBA, PMP
Interim Director Facilities Planning & Development, UK Healthcare
Stephanie Shroyer
Associate, Interior Designer, GBBN

Last year saw healthcare organizations adopting a wide array of spatial strategies to combat a quickly evolving pandemic. As we turn the corner on COVID-19, it’s important to understand what worked and what didn’t. This presentation will share a playbook of best design practices for advancing ICU staff and patient safety. Though varied, its design solutions stress flexibility for daily use and future pandemic situations. We will review design guidelines from several infectious disease units and healthcare systems, and discuss the contexts that shaped these responses, including business and operational considerations and impacts of similar units. Attendees will learn how the meta-analysis impacted different design solutions for daily use on units that can be adaptable in the future. Finally, we will share how this research informed the design of University of Kentucky’s current ICU expansion – particularly, though not limited to, its stress on flexibility as a main strategy.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
1. Use the planning playbook to implement design strategies that will enable your organization to maintain its daily business and care model 
2. Identify tangible design solutions arising from multiple case studies that can apply to future projects at multiple scales
3. Evaluate the effectiveness of evidence-based design solutions in light of the specific contexts in which they could be deployed
4. Explore the generated design guidelines that apply to new buildings or renovations

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

A03: American College of Healthcare Architects Exam Prep Seminar

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
R. Gregg Moon, RA, ACHA, EDAC
President, rgmoon consulting
 
Craig Puccetti, AIA, EDAC, ACHA
Principal-In-Charge, Austin, BSA LifeStructures
 
Tim Spence AIA, ACHA, LSSYB
President, BSA LifeStructures

ACHA’s professional credential in healthcare architecture is the only specialty certification program recognized by the AIA. This workshop will provide healthcare architects with useful information to submit their credentials and prepare for the ACHA Exam. The seminar covers: application materials, exam topics, sample questions, scoring criteria and exam schedules.

For all HFSE registered attendees who plan to attend this session please complete this form from the ACHA.  Thank you. 

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

A04: Future Proofing for the Next Pandemic Without Breaking the Bank

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Neal Boothe, PE
Principal, TLC Engineering Solutions
 
Aaron Johnson, PE, LEED AP BD+C
Managing Principal, TLC Engineering Solutions

Healthcare facility owners rode through the waves of the financial fluctuations of the COVID-19 pandemic. With recommendations coming in from multiple sources and experts emerging at an alarming rate, it is demanding to sift through the available knowledge. This session discusses future proposed code modifications and provides the attendee with an understanding of how to be prepared and how to design for the next pandemic without spending absorbent financial resources. TLC is working to update our design (primarily HVAC) to allow for pandemic responses in the future without changing the hospital's operation permanently in all other times. This will allow for better pandemic response if/when needed in the future without making permanent modifications that would cost additional money in energy costs for the life of the building.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Updated recommendations from ASHRAE based on experience with COVID
2. What did work/what didn't work well with makeshift/temporary construction due to COVID in existing facilities
3. Important considerations for future designs in hospitals. How do we not overdo HVAC for the life of the building but provide flexibility for the next Pandemic?
4. Minimum requirements from CDC and ASHRAE that leave facilities well protected and prepared.

Tuesday, December 7
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

A05: The Clinical Curator - A Reimagined Paradigm in Patient Experience

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Brittany Cook
System Vice President, Neurosciences, Norton Healthcare
 
Char Hawkins, IIDA, LEED AP, NCIDQ
Senior Interior Designer, DesignGroup
 
David Sun, MD, PhD
Executive Medical Director Norton Neuroscience Institute, Norton Healthcare

When patients choose Norton Neuroscience Institute, they are not just choosing their neurologist or neurosurgeon, they are choosing a nationally-recognized, collaborative care team ensures that patients are getting the best and most innovative care. Enveloping their care teams into one comprehensive Institute, Norton’s strong visionary stance positively led this neuroscience service line to curate a patient experience while balancing the many complex space requirements that come with its subspecialties. Administrative and clinical leadership were the driving force for fostering change. Using a case study approach, we’ll take a journey through the challenges & solutions of the neuro patient and how Norton Healthcare reimagined the process in the development of their 48,000 SF outpatient Institute. From the alignment of services in the inpatient and outpatient setting, to the engagement sessions with both patients and staff, this institute truly is a work of art come to life.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
1. Understand the cultural and organizational strategies to truly curate the patient experience with education and flexibility in mind.
2. Understanding both the staff and patient pain points in a clinical environment that deals with cognitive and mobility impairments.
3. Tailor a space for a highly specialized clinical environment today, while maintaining flexibility to accommodate any clinical department in the future
4. Lessons learned in driving the vision / culture of operations for the health system.

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

A06: In the Line of Fire

Open to Conference Attendees Only

MODERATOR
 
Gary W. Collins
Senior Director, Healthcare, Virtual Energy Solutions
SPEAKERS
 
Frank Finley
Physical Security Consultant, Force Protect Security Consultants
 
Vincent Torres
Emergency Management Director, University of Miami Health System & Miller School of Medicine

Physical security during the pandemic and during unprecedented civil unrest and division is everywhere.  It used to be behavioral health patients, disgruntled patients, gang retaliation, and active shooters.  Now we have extremist, gun right activists and the list continues to grow.  This TED Talk brings two security specialist to inform all of us just how much of a soft target healthcare facilities are and the challenges this heighten security environment brings to the clinical staff, facility mangers, the executive leadership team, healthcare architects and engineers and how they need to recognize and deal with these security challenges.  Perspectives from a nation wide consultant to an Emergency Management Director who will share his civil unrest case study.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1.Understand how to identify healthcare targets and asses vulnerability and risk
2. Prioritizse solutions defending critical assets against the highest number of likely threats with significant impact of loss
3. Learn what Physical Security professionals are typically identifying and mitigating
4. Hear from security professionals on planning and incident management of civil unrest.

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

A07: Historic Transformation: Research & Clinical-Care at Former Walter Reed

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Clairanne Pesce, CHID, LEED AP ID+C, WELL AP
Sr. Interior Designer, Array Architects
 
Mark Sardegna, AIA, LEED AP
Principal, Elkus Manfredi Architects
Irene Thompson
Executive Director, Real Estate and Capital Planning, Children's National Hospital
 
Ari Tinkoff PE
Principal, Bard, Rao + Athanas Consulting Engineers, LLC

A team of healthcare and research designers & engineers teamed with Children's National Hospital to develop an adaptive reuse plan of several buildings at the historic, former Walter Reed Campus. With an eye toward infusing the 1930-1955 era buildings with ahead-of-the-art pediatric clinical and translational research spaces, this session will allow attendees insight - from the macro campus tour and overall buildings' plan to the micro of Building 52, the 1st building transformed. The rehab of this 12-acre portion of the renown military medical campus allows decanting services to an accessible location while leaving room to backfill at the main hospital for new and expanded patient services. This campus redevelopment provided opportunities to develop an optimal plan to expand Children's National's primary and specialty care services as well as create a research and innovation center focused on developing breakthroughs in pediatric care while meeting historic and sustainability goals.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn from a team which combined design specialists in both healthcare and research
2. Takeaway client-approved and budget-sensitive solutions to historic building improvements
3. Utilize tips from infrastructure specialists how best to design upgrades in a century-old building
4. Understand how each building inter-relates to their location on campus and the campus master plan

4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

A08: Welcome to the Neighborhood: The Transformation of a Premier Cancer Program

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Sean Collins, AIA, LEED AP
Executive Director, Facilities Planning, Design and Construction, CEDARS-SINAI
Adrienne Haynes, CLS, RA, AIA
Manager, Facilities Planning, Design and Construction, CEDARS-SINAI
Louis Kaufman
Design Principal, HGA
 
Jennifer Ries
Vice President, Senior Medical Planner, HGA
As Cedars-Sinai Cancer’s nationally ranked oncology services grew in reputation, a new system-wide Neighborhood Strategy emerged that included construction of six clinics throughout the Los Angeles area, elevating Cedars-Sinai as the largest single oncology care provider in California. In tandem, leadership also decided to elevate the holistic flagship cancer center out of the basement of the main hospital and co-locate infusion services and specialties on the 7th floor of the Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion. The client's focus was elevating the patient care experience within their expanded network of oncology clinics throughout Southern California ensuring that every patient has access to the most advanced care available within their communities. This session shares how the team created great experiences for patients and staff by promoting operational efficiency and improved clinical outcomes through a Neighborhood concept on the 7th floor. By reinforcing connection and familiarity with patients, their care team, and the healthcare environment, the project creates one-stop communities of care delineated by cancer specialties. Pre- and post-occupancy evaluations will demonstrate improved efficiency, improved experience, and highlight a model for managing demand and throughput in the clinics.
 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Apply unique oncology patient 'voice of the customer' values into planning options that promote sense of community and well-being.
2. Learn how this Neighborhood concept improved throughput, reduced treatment durations and travel distances, as told through pre- and post-occupancy results.
3. Learn how this Neighborhood concept provided staff-focused collaborative work environments and other operational efficiencies.
4. Learn how the team conceptualized holistic healing environments through sustainability, integration of art, and maximizing access to natural light.

Wednesday, December 8
8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

A09: Top 10 Cautions for Adaptive Reuse in Ambulatory Care Projects

Open to Conference Attendees Only

MODERATOR
Jill Bergman
Health Principal, HDR, Inc.
SPEAKERS
William Bartley, LEED BD+C
Project Executive, RUDOLPH AND SLETTEN, INC
Jon Inman, PE
Principal, Pacific Region Leader, Mazzetti Engineering
Alejandro Iriarte, RA
Senior Health Planner, HDR
Ken King
Chief Administrative Services Officer, El Camino Hospital

This panel will be a reflective evaluation from various recent experiences in renovations and retrofits of Ambulatory Care and Outpatient Medical-Office projects set in non-traditional-healthcare building types. The panel will be comprised of one client, one mechanical/electrical engineer, one architect, and one general contractor. Each will share their top items, concerns & cautions to address at three key times – site selection, at pre-design and pre-construction.  More than just lessons learned, this panel will share insights to improve future projects and avoid unexpected surprised as more renovation projects are occurring in building types that were not originally designed to support ambulatory and outpatient building system needs. Types of non-traditional adaptive reuse building examples: Grocery Stores, Banks, strip malls, drug stores, factories, older office buildings.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn top concerns and check list items for project pre-planning, design and construction considerations.
2. Learn strategies employed when adapting to unforeseen site conditions to keep project and team on schedule.
3. Learn from different perspectives and lessons learned from past projects, what they know now, when designing and planning ambulatory spaces in non-traditional and older buildings.
4. Learn about strategies for maintaining clear communications across the team to minimize, respond, or anticipate impact of unforeseeable conditions.

9:45 AM - 10:45 AM

A10: Standardizing Outpatient Clinic Layout to Achieve Desired Outcomes

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Preeta Bajaj
Senior Medical Planner, HKS, Inc
 
Robert Canina, BA, MS, ACHE
System Executive Director of Construction and Energy Services, Baptist Health
 
Steven G. Jacobson, AIA, Lean Six Sigma CE, LEED AP
Regional Director | Executive Vice President, HKS, Inc
 
Douglas Reed, FACHE, CMPE
Vice President, Operations East Region, Baptist Health Medical Group

Outpatient clinics lend themselves to a higher level of standardization due to the type of functions performed and the degree to which these functional requirements are consistent from building to building. In this presentation we will share a standardized clinic module design and the user-centered design process utilized to develop the layout. Field research-based tools were applied to gain feedback from two completed existing clinic buildings to determine key challenges and opportunities for improvement. Additional design requirements were developed hand in hand with the client's strategic and operational vision. The impact of COVID-19 and telehealth on both key planning unit's and design was discussed in depth and reflected in the layout. With significant user input we developed a flexible module that can be utilized for both Primary and Specialty care clinics and is being rolled out for various sized projects for a renowned healthcare system in the state of Kentucky.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Demonstrate how a flexible standardized module is utilized for primary and specialty care clinics in various sized healthcare buildings.
2. Discuss how design standardization can impact key patient, staff, operational and strategic outcomes.
3. Learn about research-based tools and how they were used to inform the design of outpatient clinic module.
4. Explore the impact of the pandemic and telehealth on current clinic design.

ROOM B
Monday, December 6
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

B01: Lights! Camera! Activate! Dress Rehearsal Simulation Benefits- An Owners View

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Lynn Aguilera
Director of Strategic Space Planning and Transition Strategy, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford
 
Alyson Cole
Associate Executive Director, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
 
Kelly Guzman, MSN, RN
President & CEO, Yellow Brick Consulting
 
Allison Ong
Executive Director of Campus Transformation Project Transition Plan, Loma Linda University Health Hospitals

Even the most diligent planners recognize that issues and gaps are a reality of new facility projects. Early recognition of issues is key to a seamless activation. Varying in topic from signage to equipment functionality, early identification of issues reduces the impact to patient care and staff satisfaction on Day 1. In this session, a group of experienced new facility activation healthcare leaders will share the benefits of Dress Rehearsal in early issue identification. Dress Rehearsal is a simulation-based event aimed at replicating day-to-day operations in the new environment before Day 1 to validate training plans, increase staff confidence, and identify issues. During the session, a Dress Rehearsal framework will be reviewed, including the required resources and timeline. The team will share their experience in planning Dress Rehearsal events, offer practical insights, best practices and lessons learned that can be leveraged by fellow organizations.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. List the goals and objectives for each Dress Rehearsal event and summarize the benefits of early issues identification through these events.
2. Understand the requirements necessary to execute a Dress Rehearsal event, including timeline, staff, and other resources.
3. Describe common issues encountered in new facility projects with recommendations for prioritization, management, and mitigation.
4. Identify best practices for implementing Dress Rehearsal events for a new department and a new facility project.

11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

B02: Late Breaking Session

Open to Conference Attendees Only

This session will be announced in November. Please check back then.
1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

B03: Pandemic Care Delivery Driving Buildings of the Future Many Lessons Learned

Open to Conference Attendees Only

MODERATOR
 
Daina Pitzenberger
SVP. RN BD Project Development Services, JLL
SPEAKERS
Jerry Akin AIA LEED AP
Assistant Administrator for Planning, Design & Construction, El Paso County Hospital District
 
Patrick M. Casey
VP Operations & Real Estate, University Miami Health System
Jim Hicks
Vice President, Capital Planning, Facilities & Construction, Houston Methodist
 
Jill S.M. Pearsall, RA, NCARB
SVP, Facilities Planning & Development & Real Estate Services, Texas Children's Hospital Houston
 
John T. Wilson, AIA, CHFM, SASHE
Director Planning, Design and Construction, Parkland Health and Hospital System

Pandemics the Past, Present and Future! Panelist include hospital design and construction and clinical planner leaders from for profit, not for profit and public facilities. They will discuss lessons learned such as early warning signs from China, lessons learned from past and current pandemics and modifications of facilities. Did we overreact and or underestimate the warning signs? We're the buildings modified due to past pandemics such as HIV, SARS, and EBOLLA that enhanced the building needs to manage COVID? They will also discuss operational and care delivery changes that impacted both in and outpatient facilities from diagnosis, to testing sites to in patient care, preventive care and vaccinations. Panelists will showcase facility modifications whether in patient and outpatient as well as discuss permanent and future capital planning changes to future proof their buildings.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. History of Pandemics, Lessons Learned with regards to Facility Planning Preparation and Modifications. The panel will discuss how buildings were or were not modified during a variety of pandemics such as HIV, EBOLLA, SARS and COVID-19.
2. Facility Modifications During the Pandemic - was it overkill or spot on? The panel will discuss building modifications for in and outpatient management of testing, patient care and vaccinations.
3. Post Surge Facility Lessons Learned - Are We Ever Going to Normalize Capital Planning? The panel will discuss each capital planning strategy for their county, private and or academic medical centers. Will they change facilities and if so why and what will change?
4. Facilities of the Future - Is there really a need for Change? The panel will discuss building modifications, temporary spaces vs permanent, care delivery locations and future facility pandemic preventive measures!

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

B04: Empathic wayfinding: more cues, smarter tech and fewer signs

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Linzi Eggers
Senior Designer, Cloud Gehshan
Ian Goldberg
Principal, Cloud Gehshan
 
Andrew Shinn
Senior Planner, Real Estate, Planning, Construction, Brigham and Women's Hospital

Many tools comprise an intuitive wayfinding system - some static, some digital. For Brigham and Women's Hospital's wayfinding master designers looked at the door-to-door visitor experience with a goal of a helpful and comprehensive system that would alleviate visitor anxiety and stress. A web-based customizable app was developed to give step-by-step assistance. The system employs geo-magnetic positioning which eliminates the need to install and maintain beacons. The app has a map feature that adds technology, showing a person's position in real time. Multiple search options help ease the process. Signage clarifies entrance options, especially important since BW resides in the dense Longwood Medical Area. Staff highlight a visitor's route on simplified printed maps with bilingual directories. A reorganized interior circulation strategy, reduction in sign quantity, clear nomenclature and decreased information load reduce visitor stress when navigating the facility.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Discover wayfinding tools for the entire “door-to-door" visitor experience
2. Develop strategies and simplicity to help people navigate a complex facility
3. Discover how to develop and maintain a system that can change and adjust over time
4. Listen to how digital, handheld devices, apps can help, and what they can and can't do, lessons learned

Tuesday, December 7
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

B05: Cultural context of innovation & master planning in a developing community

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Noble Lilliestierna, PE, LEED BD+C, WELL AP, LSSYB
Mechanical Engineer, BSA LifeStructures
 
Jonathan Limpert, MD, FACS
Co-founder / General Surgeon, Mission:318 / Mercy Hospital Washington
 
Chase Miller, RA, NCARB, LSSYB
Director, Planning, BSA LifeStructures
 
Tim Spence AIA, ACHA, LSSYB
President, BSA LifeStructures

In partnership with Mission:318, BSA held an internal master planning competition to create innovative planning solutions for Yendi Municipal Hospital in Yendi, Ghana. The four interdisciplinary teams were challenged with adapting modern healthcare design to this location, considering cultural context, local materials, access to power and water, and more. At the end of the competition, the teams were combined to synthesize the best solutions from each. We explored staffing, travel distance, infection control, paths of travel, quality of care, access to water, renewable energy, and passive ventilation, to name a few. This session will explore these innovative ideas, beginning with a current state analysis by developing a future state plan. We will look at the vernacular of the region, understanding healthcare's cultural context and the challenges these create. We will walk through the ideation process of looking for new and cost-effective ways to mitigate the challenges.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Recognize and engage the vernacular in master planning
2. Understand the impact of innovation in the midst of cultural and environmental challenges
3. Visualize the integration of engineering, landscape, planning, and architecture to solve complex problems
4. Adapt modern healthcare design elements and evidence-based design to a cultural context that is challenged to support them.

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

B06: COVID Alternative Care Sites Super Session

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Richard Alvarez
Vice President, Construction Executive, Turner Construction
 
Pamela Basch
Senior Associate, Perkins Eastman
 
Thomas Caplis
Vice President & Business Group Leader, Healthcare, The Walsh Group - Walsh Construction & Archer Western
 
Susan Limbrunner
Principal - Healthcare Sector, Stantec
 
Aaron Reisinger, PMP, Colonel (Retired from Military)
Senior Vice President, Sevans Multi-Site Solutions, Inc.

In the early stages of the pandemic, two major United States cities recognized the need
for alternative care facilities (ACFs) to manage projected COVID patient loads. Under the
direction of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, along with multiple other local entities, teams in
New York and Chicago set up over 4,000 beds in under 25 days.

Due to the fast pace, limited time schedule and scarcity of materials, these projects took
careful planning, collaboration, prefabrication and enhanced safety measures. Intense
scheduling rendered decision-making both constrained and continually challenged by what
was achievable.

As highly visible endeavors during a period of growing public alarm, the projects were
of incalculable value to the public’s sense of well-being. The projects are models of how
design-build projects could operate to maximize efficiency among the design, procurement,
build and testing teams, which in turn can create time and monetary savings for the owner.

This multi-discipline team will discuss how this challenge was approached and ultimately
achieved, and how these principles can be applied in order to accelerate other alternate
delivery projects or any healthcare project.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1.  Recognize and demonstrate the benefits of an integrated design-build approach, while colocating,
works to invent viable solutions with multiple trade input.
2.  Address and track challenges and opportunities of on-the-fly changes in a project with
extremely tight deadlines.
3.  Apply the “legacy learnings” of this unique project approach that can be used to dramatically
accelerate any healthcare project, including when to use prefabrication.
4.  Identify strategies for overcoming supply chain limitations when project schedule is the
highest priority.

 

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

B07: Late Breaking Session

Open to All Attendees!

This session will be announced in November.
4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

B08: Welcoming New Life: Transforming and Modernizing Women's Centers

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Josh Goertz
Director of Planning & Design, Steward Health Care Corporate Real Estate & Facilities
 
Rachel McKenzie
Project Manager, Associate, TSA Architects

Steward Health Care prides itself on increasing community access to world-class care, and the recent transformation to their Women's Centers at two of their Utah hospitals is no exception. As Utah continues to report higher birth rates than the U.S., and as organizations continue to build brand new facilities in the region, these existing campuses aimed to reclaim their share of the Women's Services market by revitalizing their Labor and Delivery, Postpartum, Baby Well Nurseries and NICU units. This session focuses on the transformation, lessons learned, and benefits from aesthetic and architectural improvements, operational and functional layouts, and the outcome of increased satisfaction of the provider and patient experience of two Women's Centers.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Discuss the benefits of the aesthetic and operational improvements to the facilities’ marketing efforts from an owner’s perspective.
2. Discuss the collaborative design process between owner, user groups and contractor, as well as the lessons learned throughout the process.
3. Discover design innovations used to enhance patient comfort and satisfaction with the delivery process.
4. Discover design innovations used to enhance staff effectiveness, comfort, and satisfaction.

 

Wednesday, December 8
8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

B09: Lab Results: Renovating & Redesigning both Space & Process

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Tim Hurvitz
Associate Principal AIA, LEED AP BD+C, HED
Marilee Lloyd
Associate AIA, HED
 
Reid Rosehill
Lab Manager - Clinical Laboratories at UCSF Medical Center, UCSF
 
Sharon E. Woodworth
Associate Professor, University of California at San Francisco

This Case Study follows the various pathways of a Clinical Lab renovation from the original building designer, to a different architect responsible for updating the lab years later, followed by the director operating the renovated lab, and finally, the lessons learned from an usual coming together of all parties. The “before-after-during-after again” scenario highlights the value of investing in both design education for users and hands-on operational understanding for designers. Participants’ walk-away knowledge will empower designers to think differently about sizing new buildings for the long-view, about renovating with a master plan mentality, and about educating users beyond the tried & true benchmarking and mockups. This exposure to a different-way-of-thinking process will include the role subject matter experts can bring to any new or renovation process, and for this session, details specific to lab automation design and operations will be highlighted.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Attendees will think differently by: Exploring renovation options beyond the current problem to ensure future opportunities are not compromised.
2. Attendees will think differently by: Predicting the impact infrastructure decisions have on new buildings' ability to respond to future unknown needs.
3. Attendees will think differently by: Explaining the value of educating users about design process before investing their time in decision making.
4. Attendees will think differently by: Organizing a process that engages both designers and users in an equally informed decision-making process.

9:45 AM - 10:45 AM

B10: Housing for Health: A New Model for Vulnerable Populations

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Libby Boyce, L.C.S.W.
Director of Access, Referrals and Engagement, Housing for Health
 
Karla Grijalva
Senior Associate, NAC Architecture
 
Leslie Jordan
Founder, Perch Projects/Consulting Program Manager Housing for Health, Los Angeles County Department of Health Services
 
Deborah Lever
Program and Project Manager, Capital Improvements Intermediary Program Housing, Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (DHS)

For people experiencing homelessness, trips to the emergency room, stays in jail, and increasing wellbeing issues are a difficult cycle to break. Recognizing that poverty, wellness, and housing insecurity are interrelated, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted in 2017 to move forward with planning Restorative Care Villages (RCV) on County health campuses. RCVs will serve as a national model in mental health and wellbeing care for underserved and vulnerable populations ranging from interim housing to clinical/psychiatric facilities and a broad array of support services. Interim housing is a key element in the recovery process. Many agencies and programs prioritize number of clients served over providing a quality restorative environment and services that offer a path from homelessness to greater independence. In this discussion, we will look at The Lotus, an LA shelter, to learn how interim housing is being reimagined as a place of health rather than just a place to sleep.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understand how the partnership between the County and The Lotus evolved to support the RCV.
2. Discover how to evaluate space for daily living activities, access to health care, and community connection.
3. Learn how to look beyond bed count to design interim housing to support an increase in client wellness or retention.
4. Gain an understanding of how to treat interim housing with the dignity afforded to healthcare facilities.

ROOM C
Monday, December 6
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

C01: Transformational Change - A New Urgent Care

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Luke Kroeger
Director of Clinic Operations, Retail & Community Health, UnityPoint Clinic - Waterloo Region
 
Kristina Mehmen, AIA, ACHA
Principal, INVISION

We've heard time and time again that an alternative primary care delivery model that is distinct from existing primary care and emergency platforms is desperately needed in our communities that concentrates on customer service and the patient experience. To truly accomplish this goal, a transformational change was required . The transformational change was designed to be organization-wide and has been enacted over the last few years. This presentation will look at an Urgent Care Model that was designed to appeal to busy, younger adults that would be located in a retail center closer to where people live, work and play. We evaluated markets and choose key building sites that would capture all related business and build relationships. An operational model was created that cultivated clinical quality, speed and customer experience. Our goal was to integrate the health system image and values into the Urgent Care brand so that the health system story would come alive in the community.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how a healthcare system implemented a transformational change
2. Explore how connecting with patients and coordinating care can improve patient outcomes and build brand loyalty
3. Identify emerging trends in healthcare that can be implemented into design solutions that are adaptable and create quality patient experiences
4. Understand how outpatient services can improve the overall patient experience

 

 

Sponsored By:

 

 

11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

C02: Energy Efficiency is the Catalyst to Overhauling Texas Healthcare

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Abraham Bejil
Director, Engineering, Midland Health
Ashley Downes
Director of Tucson, Bernhard

Midland Health has long had a mission to make a lasting impact on its community by improving the health of its people. To achieve this, Midland created a master plan to renovate their facilities, which began in 2009 with a new patient tower. When the tower opened in 2012, Midland knew they had a problem. Due to inadequate commissioning, the tower was consuming vastly more energy than expected. Bernhard was then selected to retro-commission the tower and a partnership began. Since then, Midland has trusted Bernhard with more than 25 projects over the last 10 years. 2020 saw the two agree to a 15-year energy asset concession arrangement which provides $16.2 million in immediate unrestricted cash, while also addressing significant capital renewal, deferred maintenance, and energy optimization. Using a long-term energy asset concession was the answer to continue Midland's mission to positively impact its patients and evolve health care in not only Texas, but potentially across the nation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Observe how energy efficiency enhances patient care, including the physical, emotional, and social well-being of occupants.
2. Evaluate the benefits of ling-term energy asset concession arrangements for facility managers, patients and administrators alike.
3. Assess results including infrastructure improvements, savings in future capital renewal and replacement costs from a facility budget, etc.
4. Evaluate successful project delivery methods and facilities improvements for increased energy efficiency and resource savings.

 

Sponored By:

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

C03: The Continuing Evolution of EDs: A Brief Look Back & Dive into the Future

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Jason Dunkel, MBA, M. Div.
President and CEO, AdventHealth North Pinellas
 
John Grattendick AIA, ACHA
Project Manager, HuntonBrady Architects
 
Hernan Rivera, AIA
Associate Principal, HuntonBrady Architects

Healthcare executives, their staffs, facility managers, planners, and architects need the most current information before embarking on renovating, expanding, or building a new emergency department. Input from expertise within the hospital and as well as a perspective from the larger healthcare community is essential. With fierce competition, wait times posted on billboards, and online scheduling, the hospital must develop a business plan that ensures success. Rapid growth in the number of FSEDs requires research on the demographics of patient population when considering where and how large their facility should be. Change is also occurring inside the department itself:

-Its location with respect to the main entrance of the hospital.
-An evolving central core into space for many highly trained specialists.
-Treatment rooms changing in size and character with many distinct environments.

A case study of an ED relocation and expansion provides insights into the latest design trends.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understand the demographic data that has led to the dynamic growth of emergency departments.
2. Learn how hospitals respond to a rapidly changing healthcare environment.
3. Understand the design drivers used to create spaces conducive to effective treatment while sympathetic to patients and visitors.
4. Learn strategies to address complicated renovations and tight budgets yet create an impressive community asset.

 

Sponsored By:

 

 

 
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

C04: Life Safety Master Planning - The next 10 years

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKER
 
Michael A. Crowley, PE, FSFPE, FASHE
Principal Advisor, Fire Protection Engineering, Coffman Engineers, Inc.

Health care facilities are designed for a life cycle. Many facilities are renovated many times it the buildings life cycle. Over the course of these renovations and upgrades the applicable codes have changed. Some requirements for new are more stringent and some are less stringent. This presentation will outline how to do a life safety master plan. It will also point out some advantages of not retaining old life safety configurations.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understand the current codes and the update cycle for the AHJs ( Local, State, Center for Medicare and Medicaid)
2. Explain the purpose of the Life Safety Master Plan including egress, smoke zones locations, suite sizes and future flexibility.
3. Summarized the advantages and disadvantages of evaluating the current Life Safety Master Plan.
4. Recognize the other uses of the Life Safety Master Plan including renovations , additions, changes of occupancy , changes in use , surge capabilities, and reduction in inspection testing and maintenance.

 

Sponsored By:

 

 

 
Tuesday, December 7
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

C05: Co-Locate or Duplicate? How to decide where to plan HOD, IP and OP services

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Julie Dumser
Vice President, Blue Cottage of Cannon Design
Troy Hoggard
Principal, Cannon Design
 
Victoria Navarro, MBA-HCM
Regional Director of Planning, Design and Construction, North Wisconsin, Advocate Aurora Health
 
Chris Waldron
Project Executive, The Boldt Company

A focus of healthcare today is the Quadruple Aim: Improved Patient Experience, Better Outcomes, Lower Costs, and Improved Clinical Experience. The micro-hospital, also known as neighborhood or small acute care hospital has become a major part of delivering on the health system’s ability to advance their strategic goals and achieve the quadruple aim. This session will demonstrate Advocate Aurora’s 2025 destination health strategy for accessible, affordable, population health. This workshop demonstrates decision making tools, balancing between CMS regulations, efficiencies of staff, clinical adjacencies, and customer experience. Included is an interactive exercise to test knowledge on “Inpatient”, “Outpatient” and “Hospital Outpatient Department” when considering adding inpatient services to an existing outpatient facility. We will explore operational, and facility impacts of these designations to arm the audience with knowledge to make these strategic decisions.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understand the Quadruple Aim and articulate how the Small Acute Care Hospital designation can meets those four factors.
2. Recognize how different building occupancies and licensure of services such as surgery, imaging, and inpatient beds impact location planning.
3. Summarize the decision tools needed to assess viability of HOD, Inpatient and Outpatient care settings.
4. Test your knowledge: Can you determine which services can co-locate in which type of building construction?

 

Sponsored By:

 

 

 
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

C06: What's New for 2022: Changes in the 2022 FGI Guidelines

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Ellen Taylor, PhD, AIA, MBA, EDAC
Vice President for Research, The Center for Health Design
 
David Uhaze
Health Facility Design Consulting, NFPA, International Codes, FGI Guidelines

This discussion will provide an overview of changes to the next edition of the FGI Guidelines for Design and Construction documents, scheduled for release in early 2022. The presenters will discuss key factors that influenced changes across the 2022 Guidelines documents. Topics include considerations for inclusive environments that support all populations; new clinical spaces that have the potential to reduce overcrowding in emergency departments; and a new unit for intensive outpatient and partial hospitalization programs for patients with behavioral and mental health diagnoses who do not require inpatient care. The presenters will discuss efforts to evaluate issues like improving access to rural health, removing barriers for childbirth centers, and providing minimum requirements for burn units. Included in the discussion will be a review of the major changes to the Residential Guidelines, with particular focus on new minimum square footages in nursing home resident rooms.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Discuss how changes in the 2022 Guidelines will impact the design of clinical spaces in health and residential care facilities
2. Describe the major changes that will appear in the 2022 FGI Guidelines.
3. Explain how the new behavioral health spaces in the 2022 Guidelines documents can reduce overcrowding in emergency departments.
4. State how using the 2022 Guidelines for a project can provide a safe and effective patient care environment at a reasonable cost.

 

Sponsored By:

 

 

 
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

C07: A Community Approach to Healthcare: Looking Beyond the Clinic Walls

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Andrea Caracostis MD, MPH
Chief Executive Officer, Asian American Health Coalition dba Hope Clinic
 
Stephen Cheatham
Vice President, mStrategic Partners
 
Yong Gan, AIA, LEED AP
Associate Partner, PhiloWilke Partnership
 
Steve Schultz, AIA, ACHA, LEED AP, NCARB
Partner, PhiloWilke Partnership

Natural disasters often bring awareness to the community. In 2017, Hurricane Harvey shook the Texas and Louisiana coasts. This catastrophic event brought up many conversations within the HOPE Clinic organization regarding how they could be better prepared for such emergencies and provide community support all year long. This session will focus on how the leadership looked beyond the clinic walls and designed a resilient new HOPE Clinic facility. You will learn about embracing a diverse community by expanding the traditional clinic environment. Additionally, you will hear about critical design decisions made to ensure the facility is equipped no matter the emergency.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. How to design to respond to diversity
2. How to design a resilient facility
3. How to capitalize a facilities program to become an economic catalyst in the community
4. How to embrace community and create a welcoming and flexible multi-purpose clinic

 

Sponsored By:

 

 

 
4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

C08: Late Breaking Session

Open to Conference Attendees Only

This session will be announced in November, please check back then.

 

Sponsored By:



 

Wednesday, December 8
8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

C09: From Vision to Delivery: Creating a Prototype Primary Care Clinic

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Dr. David Buchholz
Senior Founding Medical Director for Primary Care, Columbia University Irving Medical Center
 
Amy Carter
Healthcare Planner, Gensler
 
Bin Weng, AIA
Northeast Practice Area Leader - Healthcare, Gensler

Pandemic-related forces have not only amplified the importance of making quality care accessible but have spurred new and innovative processes for designing spaces that reimagine the patient experience. Sharing the design process behind the expansion of Columbia University Irving Medical Center's primary care practice with their newest location, which was completed during the pandemic, attendees will learn how the project team created a state-of-the-art prototype primary care clinic intended to revamp an ambulatory network. An interactive exercise will identify and synthesize challenges around the vision, strategy, planning, and design around care delivery and how to align these components for a successful build-out of a facility. Presenters will demonstrate the importance of coordination between designers, facilities, and builders and how working during the crisis pushed the boundary in creating a site that demonstrates how the practice of medicine is transforming.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Develop an applicable vision that supports the provider's desired position based on the need of the community served
2. Assess and apply a process of analysis and differentiation, supported by consumer research, to advance care
3. Recognize what drives successful delivery and how it is best supported through a broad and diverse engagement of stakeholders and constituents
4. Gain perspective on designing and implementing a capital project under constraints and solutions to approach this

 

Sponsored By:

 

 

 
9:45 AM - 10:45 AM

C10: The Impact of Daylight and Views on Patient Satisfaction and Staff Burnout

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Anjali Joseph
Professor, Director, Center for Health Facilities Design and Testing, Clemson University
Sahar Mihandoust, Ph.D.
Research Assistant Professor at the Center for Health Facilities Design and Test, Clemson University
Usha Satish, PhD
Professor, Department of Psychiatry, SUNY Upstate Medical University

Access to daylight and views have a significant impact on patient satisfaction and staff burnout, both of which are critical to hospital reputation, clinical outcomes, and financial performance. In this session we will share finding from two studies that explored these outcomes. In the first study, 651 participants were asked about their previous stay in the hospital, their perception of windows in their room, and perceived ratings of the hospital and care quality. In the second study, 20 healthcare professionals spent three hours on two days working in a healthcare environment, one day with access to daylight and the other day with the blinds drawn. At the end of each day, they completed burnout scales and 45-minute long medical simulations designed to test their clinical performance. We will share what these findings mean for hospital design and how to optimize patient and staff satisfaction through the healthcare environment.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Discuss current trends in hospital design and how they influence patient and staff satisfaction
2. Understand window design features that can directly or indirectly affect patients' perception of care quality and satisfaction with healthcare.
3. Explore the impact of blinds on healthcare staff burnout and productivity.
4. Discover how to design windows in future patient room projects to best support patients and staff satisfaction.

 

Sponsored By:

 

 

 
ROOM D
Monday, December 6
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

D01: How a Single Innovative, Community-focused Design will Reshape a City

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Dan Cebelinski, MBA, PE, CHFM
Director Facilities, Essentia Health
 
Scott Garand AIA
Principal, EwingCole
 
Saul Jabbawy
Principal, Director of Design, EwingCole
 
John Vidmar
Vice President Facilities, Essentia Health-East Region

Essentia Health, with its Vision Northland project, sought to create more than just a hospital; they wanted to create a civic asset, bold enough to serve as the standard bearer of health and a physical celebration of the community it serves. The building, whose design is inspired by the natural and urban textures of Duluth, will provide public amenities such as a chapel, conference spaces, retail, dining commons and a roof garden with breathtaking views overlooking Lake Superior. Its patient-centric design will drive positive patient outcomes by consolidating adaptable inpatient rooms, procedure rooms and OR platforms, and flexibly planned outpatient spaces. As the bellwether project of progressive redevelopment, it is expected to shift the healthcare environment in Duluth and the region, and financially stimulate the Superior Street area - an underutilized commercial and entertainment hub of Duluth.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how this amenities, context, and scale of this 928,000 SF building was integrated into the existing urban fabric of Duluth.
2. Learn how innovative design opportunities harness the power of the senses to create experiences that stand out and resonate with its community.
3. See how operational efficiency, utilization modeling, and space syntax tools informed programming assumptions.
4. Learn how to design flexibility for changing models of care including acuity adaptable rooms, procedure rooms and OR platforms with shared support.

11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

D02: Impactful Lessons Learned from Integrating Cardiovascular Care

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Jim Albert, AIA, ACHA, LEED AP
Principal, Hord Coplan Macht, Inc.
Mike Erickson, MS, MBA, CHFM
Vice President Support Services, MidMichigan Health
 
Serena Peters, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, EDAC
Senior Associate, Hord Coplan Macht
Sunita Vadakath, MD
VP of Service Lines, MidMichigan Health

In the fall of 2020, in the midst of COVID-19, MidMichigan Medical Center opened its new Cardiovascular Care Center. This building serves as the hub for a 7-hospital, 22-county health system and brings together all aspects of cardiovascular care into one center of excellence. This session will review key planning guidelines in developing a specialty care center including our project’s guiding principles, location, and how we organized the building. It will then focus on the challenges that MidMichigan Health faced in consolidating a wide range of specialties, as they integrated the patient care experience while co-locating services. Find out our potential architectural, operational, and technological pitfalls, and see how our consistent leadership paired with proper advanced planning overcame many of these specific obstacles. We will measure the success in delivering on MidMichigan Health’s guiding principle: to create a welcoming new home for all their cardiovascular patients.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Establish the principles for creating an integrated cardiovascular care center
2. Identify the short and long-term impact of COVID-19 on providing specialized outpatient care
3. Review the challenges organizations face when eliminating service line silos.
4. Celebrate the patient and staff benefits of developing an integrated care model

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

D03: Bed demands are NOT declining: An AMC's Response Pre & Post COVID-19

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Marybeth Dietz, AIA, ACHA
Architect and Project Manager, SmithGroup
 
Tim Gregg, AIA, ACHA
Healthcare Studio Leader, SmithGroup
 
Holly Harris, AIA, LEED AP BD+C
Architect and Healthcare Planner, SmithGroup
 
Christine Strom PE LEED AP
Director, Planning & Construction, Northwestern Memorial HealthCare

Northwestern Memorial Hospital (NMH) is 22-stories, 2-million SF in downtown Chicago. When increased patient acuity and a consistently occupied beds forced patients to remain in the ER longer, NMH began transforming its ambulatory pavilion into an inpatient tower in 2007. SmithGroup is executing the next phase, adding 64 beds to the campus. SmithGroup conducted POE's of the previous transformations and benchmarked bed towers across the country and compared them with NMH pavilions. The team leveraged these results to convert square-shaped ambulatory clinics into inpatient floors, all while planning for functional flexibility to support universal operational procedures. This session highlights the problem definition, planning, and design phases executed utilizing 3D visualizations and virtual reality. The team will share lessons from evaluating the design in response to COVID-19 and how both floors are prepared to adapt existing resources for unknown future capacity demands.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understand constraints and solutions to transform existing outpatient clinic floors with atypical square footage ratios and infrastructure system restraints into an inpatient care unit focused on efficient operations and adaptable for future patient populations.
2. Learn how to conduct post occupancy evaluations of generations of existing bed units to efficiently collect and analyze user input before user group meetings convene.
3. Analyze and leverage research, POEs, and benchmarking data for functional and operational planning comparisons during the project programming and design phase.
4. Determine the best communication methods foster quick decision making in both the physical and virtual collaboration environments: 3D simulations, virtual reality, and operational scenarios.

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

D04: Is There a Safe Haven for Active, Older Adults During a Pandemic?

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Susan Bruker RA
Principal, Lawrence Group
Maureen Dunn
Sr. Director of Strategic Initiative, St. Andrews Resources for Seniors System
 
Mary Alice Ryan
President/CEO, St. Andrews Resources for Seniors System

The pandemic has dramatically affected the senior living industry, including active adults who are members of a life community or considering retirement living. As communities worked to develop new game plans, some residual effects include: Disenchantment with the life care community concept due to isolation, fear of community living due to potential virus exposure, limited technology and social connectivity, loss of staff, empty apartment units, financial burdens and limited control over individuals choosing not to comply with pandemic standards. As the industry advances, is there a future safe haven for our active older adults who want the engagement of community without the risk? 
During this session, attendees will learn how different independent living options fared during the pandemic and analyze solutions. The remainder of the presentation will focus on Summerville at Francis Place, a project currently under construction in St. Louis, MO, built with the above mentioned concerns in mind

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Assess different independent living options and how each fared during the pandemic.
2. Summarize safety, care and design solutions to prepare for future outbreaks.
3. Analyze alternative housing types for active senior adults.
4. Plan for the future of active senior communities.

 

Tuesday, December 7
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

D05: Road Map to Net Zero, The Journey of the Emory Musculoskeletal Institute

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Scott D. Boden, MD
VP of Business Innovation, Emory Healthcare, CMO/CQO Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital
Teresa Campbell
Principal, Orlando Healthcare Practice Leader, HKS Inc.
Greg Johnson, PE, LEED AP
Partner, Newcomb & Boyd, LLP
Sammy Shams, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP BD+C, WELL AP
Sustainable Design Professional, HKS Inc.

Healthcare buildings are synonymous with high energy consumption and elevated carbon emissions that discourage teams from pursuing building performance goals like LEED and Architecture 2030. This was not acceptable for Emory Healthcare or Scott D. Boden, MD, visionary, and champion behind the new outpatient institute. Dr. Boden negotiated with vendors enhance the buildings performance, challenged the design team to exceed LEED Silver goals and ultimately set up a path for a Net-Zero energy building. The Emory Musculoskeletal Institute project leveraged an integrative design process that incorporates AIA measures of design excellence. This allowed the project team to collaborate early and maintain specific strategies throughout design. It's not a perfect process, but one that is agile enough for any project to use and modify as needed while possibly achieving net positive energy, water, and carbon in the future. The panel will cover the journey and lessons learned to achieve net zero.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understand how to set up a framework for an integrative design process.
2. Integrate AIA measures of design excellence into project planning and design.
3. Determine feasible methods to achieve net zero energy performance.
4. Learn how to apply building performance analysis to guide design decision making.

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

D06: Planning the new Austin State Hospital for the continuum of care

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Sydney Harris
Director of Mental Health Care Redesign, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
 
Brian D. Roeder
Principal, Page Southerland Page, Inc.
 
Dr Stacey Thompson
Psychologist and the Superintendent, Austin State Hospital
 
Sara Wengert
Principal, architecture+

The new Austin State Hospital (ASH) will serve as the anchor of ambitious master plan developed by a consortium of innovative stakeholders. The ASH Resign has initiated construction on a 240-bed inpatient building which will offer brain health care to some of the most vulnerable members of the central Texas community. This presentation will discuss the role of this cutting edge building in the State's effort to integrate its inpatient care model within the full spectrum of brain health services, create partnerships among care providers and establish a presence in the community that visibly defies stigma. It will discuss the evolution of the building plan and how the organization of the building's components, therapy areas, support spaces both indoors and outdoors create a progressive recovery and emergence of patients from living quarters into the greater care community. We will share the processes of managing monumental change in the healthcare environment with key users.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Observe the Master Planning efforts and the role of the new Austin State Hospital.
2. Evaluate the development organizational models that support best practices for the new State Hospital.
3. Measure key programming goals and innovative design attributes for addressing brain health
4. Understanding projected changes in patient flow at the new State Hospital.

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

D07: Mission Control: Strategies for Designing Centralized Care Centers

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Parveen Chand, MHA, FACHE
Chief Operating Officer, Indiana University Health Academic Health
 
Corey M. Gaarde, FHIMSS, CPHIMS
Associate Principal, Project Executive, IMEG Corp
 
Mike Lawless, PE, LEED AP
Principal, Director of Innovation, IMEG Corp.

Establishing a comprehensive “care coordination command center” can transform a hospital’s approach to improved operations and management. These command centers employ a multi-disciplinary team approach to manage holistic building operations and the patient and caregiver experience to ensure the best outcome for everyone and the most efficient use of resources for the healthcare system. Care coordination command centers are most successful when caregivers and healthcare administrators collaborate with designers, engineers, and vendors to design a facility with the patient and the caregiver at the center. This presentation, given by an academic healthcare organization executive, engineer, and healthcare technology advisor will discuss potential strategies using patient and caregiver input, real-time data, operational planning, and technology to design new models of care while improving efficiency, reducing medical waste, and creating a better patient and caregiver experience.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Perceive the broader consolidation of service lines to maximize efficiencies while improving the patient and caregiver experience.
2. Understand the level of upfront planning and organizational engagement that is required to develop a comprehensive strategy.
3. See the impact of a strategy on the design, build, activation and ongoing continuous improvement processes.
4. Recognize the potential outcomes of designing and implementing a centralized care center strategy.

4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

D08: Covid & Clinic Design: What Changed & What's Next?

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Jennifer Christmann FACHE
President, The Christmann Group
 
Steve Wiser FAIA
Architect, Wiser Designs

The COVID19 pandemic altered all our lives, including drastic shifts in the way healthcare is provided. It has had and will continue to have a lasting impact on the way clinics are designed. New building components such as exterior testing shelters, barriers between patients & staff, vaccine storage rooms, and telehealthcare are just a few of the transformations that have already impacted clinic construction. This presentation will explore these recent dramatic design shifts, along with comparing two clinics by the same client, one built the year before the pandemic, and the other built a year after. What changed? What might be next? Case studies and evidence-based design methods will be featured.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Find out how Covid changed clinic design
2. Learn evidence based design methods for clinic design
3. Explore case studies of pre and post Covid designed clinics
4. What design changes might impact clinics next

Wednesday, December 8
8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

D09: Integrated Project Delivery Approach: Transition, Activation, Move Planning

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Bridget Graham, MBAH, PMP
Senior Project Manager, HTS, Inc
 
Walter Jones, Jr., AIA, LEED, EDAC
Senior Vice President, Campus Transformation, The MetroHealth System
 
Melanie Viquez, PMP, FACHE, EDAC
VP of Operations and Strategic Development, HTS, Inc

In 2015, MetroHealth embarked on an ambitious transformation of their campus near downtown Cleveland, OH. In Fall 2022, they will open the doors of the MetroHealth Glick Center, an 11-floor, LEED-certified hospital. This transformation is the largest self-funded county hospital project in US history. In our presentation, the MetroHealth Transformation team will describe how they justified the need for external resources to support the transition and activation of the Glick Center. They will also describe the effort to solicit the best in the industry for their project focusing on team structure, budget development, and steps taken to set expectations. MetroHealth will also highlight the opportunity to incorporate the latest in process and technology. The HTS project team will describe how we developed our team of industry experts to manage this transition process, with a shared goal to bring MetroHealth's facility to life

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Discuss how to define the scope and overall budget for a Transition/Activation/Move Project.
2. Discuss team composition and components that support the full scope of a Transition/Activation/Move engagement through the lens of the HTS process.
3. Examine the level of staff involvement in the respective phases of a Transition Planning project.
4. Learn how the team will integrate change management and digital learning tools, including AR and VR, throughout the process.

9:45 AM - 10:45 AM

D10: The Power of Choice: Our Project Wide Safety & COVID-19 Take 2 Moments

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Jeff Maples
Senior Project Manager, Mortenson Construction
 
Victoria Navarro, MBA-HCM
Regional Director of Planning, Design and Construction, North Wisconsin, Advocate Aurora Health

How does a world-wide pandemic that changes how people interact, work is performed and elevated stresses at home for the workforce affect the safety culture and performance on a 460,000 SF replacement hospital project? When you recognize the problem, admit to the unknown but commit to solutions and get everyone to buy-in to working together, it doesn't It took a job-wide stand-down over the course of 3 days to make sure the project was aligned on safety expectations, provide training to craftworkers, and ensure leadership support was being properly applied. This, combined with the addition of a human performance safety consultant and the natural resiliency and comradery of construction workers, allowed our safety statistics to consistently improve and support zero COVID-19 transmissions between individuals when 400+ workers were on-site daily during the project peak. When you empower people to make the right choice, positive results are achievable!

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. COVID-19 Best Practices utilized during construction
2. Human Performance Safety Consultant impacts to work performance
3. Safety performance trends before and during the pandemic
4. Safety, cleaning and behavioral practices that will be maintained moving forward

ROOM E
Monday, December 6
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

E01: Microgrids: Powering the Future of Healthcare Resiliency

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Angelica Chow, PE, LEED AP: BD+C
Electrical Engineer, Mazzetti
Rame Hemstreet
VP of Operations, National Facilities Services, Chief Energy Officer, Kaiser Permanente

Since fuel cells recently became an acceptable emergency power generation source, microgrids are now being reviewed in the current cycle (similarly for emergency power). However, the lines between “normal” and “emergency” power are increasingly blurring. The silent operation of a hospital microgrid illustrates a paradigm shift. The rapid advancement of technology is forcing people to reevaluate the opportunities and, resultantly, regulations for how power is provided to critical facilities like hospitals. Code-making organizations, hospital facility planners, and teams must understand how the combination of economics and technological advancements has bent the concept of ‘emergency power’ to the breaking point. For the sake of the safety of healthcare facilities and the benefit of patients, new ways of thinking about, and designing for, emergency power generation are required.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Decipher the historical conversation around emergency power and potential barriers for new ways of thinking.
2. Assess the economic and technological advancements that are changing conventional thought re-emergency power.
3. Discover how a microgrid is currently benefitting a hospital and how it could be applicable for your own hospital.
4. Prepare for the next code cycle and power paradigm shift.

 

 

Sponored By:

11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

E02: How Custom Art Programs can be a valuable partner in your DEI Program

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Annette Ridenour
President & Founder, Aesthetics Inc

Today most hospitals are undergoing DEI assessments and training. They are often overlooking a potent tool to express a more inclusive organizational culture. Custom-designed Regional Arts programs are an excellent way to express the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion of each Healthcare Institution to their community. Recruiting regional artists to create artworks that speak to the diversity of their community allows a patient, family member, or clinician to see themselves as a valued member each time they visit your facility. This presentation will give examples of a tried and true process to design and implement multicultural art programs and examples of artwork executed and installed. For far too long, nature images have defined a healing environment in healthcare. By including patients, employees, and community members in decision-making, and understanding your employees and patients' background, Art can be an essential part of your DEI program.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
1: Learn how to bring your art program into conversation with your DEI consultant and program
2: Learn how to find community partners, arts associations, museums, local diversity groups while coordinating with your design and administrative teams
3: Learn how to develop goals and processes to ensure, diversity, equity and inclusion while insuring the art program is evidence based and timeliness.
4: Learn how to bring all of the diverse voices to the table and create consensus on possibilities for your arts program

Sponored By:

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

E03: Planning Facilities for Future of Healthcare Delivery based on Data

Open to Conference Attendees Only

MODERATOR
 
Lisa Feeley
National Healthcare Sector Leader, NOVA Engineering
SPEAKERS
 
Mark Dykes
Energy Projects Manager, University of Florida Shands Hospital
 
Kevin Gombotz, PE
Vice President, Building Energy Solutions, Envinity, Inc.
 
Bradley Pollitt, AIA
Vice President, Facilities, UF Health Shands Hospital

Data, Data, Data: Will the right data please come forward and help us to do More with Less? NORMAL and AVERAGE no longer exists. Extraordinary and Exceptional are the new MUST haves and must dos in our industry when it comes to delivery of services.

To obtain maximum success we must know our team, know our patients, and CUSTOM build facilities in the future to meet patients' needs to improve their outcomes and experience. So, what must we understand and embrace to give us a good chance of success? (How do you skate to where the puck is going when it is going in five directions at once?). Brad, Mark, and Kevin will review case studies and demonstrate what data should be used to design and operate healthcare facilities that are more adaptable, more compliant, and have fewer maintenance headaches and lower operating costs.  They will share outcomes from leveraging data. They will highlight tactics on how to secure the right data and demonstrate how you can ensure you are planning, building, and adapting the right facilities to meet your patients' needs.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Gain insights on how to determine what type of data to access within your system that impacts your decisions on types of facility systems needed
2. Leverage data to justify infrastructure needs while debunking other gotta-have myths
3. Apply data from real construction and operations to level-up next generation facility design
4. Utilize real-time data analytics for continuous validation of business plans

Sponored By:

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

E04: More than Skin Deep: The Garry Hurvitz Brain Sciences Centre

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Scott Barron, OAA, AAA, RAIC.
Senior Architect, HDR Architecture Associates Inc
 
Barbara Miszkiel, OAA, AAPEI, FRAIC, LEED AP, EDAC
Director, Health, HDR Architecture Associates Inc
Anton Rabindran, P. Eng.
Project Manager, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

For the first Canadian centre of its kind, leading the way for revolutionary solutions to devastating brain disorders including stroke, dementia, ALS, mood and anxiety, while providing leading-edge care, this design is “more than skin deep”; making research and discovery transparent while embracing the community as a vital part of the client’s journey to recovery. We have known for decades the positive impact design can have on our mental health. But what has been done to rethink our model of “mental health facility” for more positive outcomes is either inconsistent, sporadic or constrained by public perception. Discover how an architect and client team worked together to challenge the boundaries of established thinking through a consistent evidence-based approach to design for mental health within a dense urban campus in order to address the mental health and wellness of all - inpatients, outpatients, caregivers, researchers and the broader community.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how the new Brain Sciences Centre is designed to create an easily accessible, welcoming and safe mental health environment within a tight urban site despite being literally sandwiched between two buildings;
2. Explore how to find “silver linings in site constraints” to create functional and safe outdoor space for both ambulatory and acute mental health patients;
3. See how client-architect collaboration in challenging status quo balanced patients’ independence with caregivers’ need to know;
4. Discover how evidence-based design was applied for positive mental health outcomes for everyone – from patients to caregivers, researchers and the entire campus community for this Centre of Excellence in Mental and Behavioral Health.

 

Sponored By:

Tuesday, December 7
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

E05: Finding efficiencies with 3D documentation throughout the project lifecycle

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Sean Ashcroft
National Healthcare Leader, DPR Construction
 
Cliff Clark
Senior Project Manager - Planning, Design and Construction, Methodist Health System
Chris Grossnicklaus
Healthcare Studio Leader, Vice President, Corgan
 
Ashish Gupta
Project Manager, Virtual Design and Construction Coordinator, DPR Construction

Immersive 3D imaging and documentation technologies have become more prominent with social distancing, and the creative application of these tools is increasing efficiency in healthcare design, construction & operations. 3D imaging tools enable “real-time” virtual collaboration and the accuracy of data collected by these high-resolution scans can affect all the downstream information captured for a building, informing design, construction, and facilities management for years to come. Many examples of productivity improvements from the application of 3D technologies can be seen across a building’s design, construction, and operations lifecycle. We will discuss a few of these applications, the technologies leveraged, an RC car that acted as a mapping tool, as well as quantitative cost and schedule efficiencies.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Identify how 3D documentation during construction can benefit project management and building operations throughout the lifecycle of a building.
2. Obtain the means to analyze opportunities for 3D documentation that enables “real-time” virtual collaboration and increases data accuracy.
3. Analyze the cost, best use cases, and benefits for the application of key 3D documentation technologies including Matterport and StructionSite.
4. Examine efficiencies created through 3D documentation for progress reports, virtual punchlist, mock-up reviews, production tracking, and inspections.

 

Sponored By:

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

E06: Keep it Lean and Simple: Developing Future Ambulatory Surgical Services

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Bob Gesing AIA
Principal, National Healthcare Practice Leader, TrinityNAC
 
Les Matthews, MD
Chief of Orthopedic Surgery, MedStar Health

The impact of the COVID pandemic has greatly impacted healthcare delivery in so many ways. The pandemic has accelerated a growing desire among providers to acquire or expand into the surgery center business. One of the biggest drivers of this shift has been eroding hospital patient volumes due to fears of contracting COVID-19. Patients are more reluctant now than ever to go into a hospital setting when there is an alternative setting focused on just what the patient is looking for. Ambulatory Surgery Centers, smaller and focused, reflect a “safer and more convenient” choice for patients. With increasing services to ASCs, the risk is exporting the complexities and inefficiencies of the hospital mindset as well! This session will provide real life examples and recommendations from the surgeon, nursing and design perspective on what TO DO and NOT Do to ensure your future surgical operations are efficient, adaptable, profitable and create an exceptional patient experience.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understand from a surgeon’s perspective how to improve throughput and build consensus, including incentives to increase utilization and loyalty.
2. Gain insight on efficient staffing protocols and operations from a for-profit operational perspective to streamline staffing and workflow.
3. Explore operational and programmatic analytics and organizational models to create right-sized programs and efficient, adaptable, expandable plans.
4. Be introduced to experiential care mapping techniques that will ascertain the “Bright Spots” and “Pain Points” for patients, family and staff.

 

Sponored By:

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

E07: POE Lessons Learned in the Transition from Healthcare to Health

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Lauren Fiedler
Director of Healthcare Program Development, Flad Architects
 
Joe Ryan, PT, DPT, MBA
Director of Ancillary Services, Lee Health
 
Laura Stillman
Principal/National Healthcare Practice Leader, Flad Architects

Post occupancy evaluations (POEs) are essential for understanding the effectiveness of facility design strategies and promoting continuous improvement. POEs are most valuable when data collection goes beyond traditional methods and uncovers “the why," analyzing the many factors that result in performance. This session will review quantitative and qualitative findings from a recently completed POE of a new health and wellness center, Lee Health Coconut Point. Presenters will share learnings relating to community engagement, patient and team experience, workflows, technology, outdoor spaces, and more. The session will reflect on organizational and cultural factors that influence success and how those factors relate to design. It will also address findings related to the planning process, from lean planning and process improvement to changing operational assumptions. The session will conclude by reflecting on performance during the pandemic and future readiness.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Apply POE learnings from planning a new facility where end-users were not yet available; learn unforeseen outcomes and fail-safe strategies.
2. Review POE methods, innovations in gathering data, and quantitative results on patient experience, community engagement, and design strategies.
3. Describe organizational, process, and cultural challenges associated with a new facility and illustrate new, documented change solutions.
4. Learn innovative ideas to support operational transitions into new healthcare facilities.

 

Sponored By:

4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

E08: Immersive Distraction: Improving Pediatric Infusion Experience with Gaming

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Georgia Cameron, AIA, ACHA
Partner | Studio Principal Healthcare, Little Diversified Architectural Consulting
 
Nicole Norris, CLSSB, Associate AIA
Architectural Associate /Lean Specialist, Little Diversified Architectural Consulting
 
Javier E. Oesterheld, MD
Jeff Gordon Children's Foundation Endowed Chair - Pediatric Cancer, Levine Children's Hospital at Carolinas Medical Center

This session will feature a healthcare facility designer and a pediatric oncologist sharing the challenges and benefits of creating an immersive gaming space for pediatric patients undergoing oncology-related infusion treatments. The discussion will cover topics including why Levine Children's Hospital chose to implement this space in their clinic and the different medical outcomes observed in patients who use the space. We will also explain design techniques used to make the space age-appropriate for all children, from toddlers to teenagers, and the technical/security challenges associated with creating this type of environment within a hospital-based clinic. Finally, the speakers will discuss the scale-ability of the immersive gaming experience as the current oncology clinic finds a new and improved facility.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Attendees will understand new techniques for designing positive pediatric care experiences that they can utilize in their own work.
2. Attendees will be able to accommodate and balance age-appropriate design for the wide age range of pediatrics.
3. After hearing this case study, attendees will understand the factors to consider when adjusting the scale of the immersive Infusion space to fit their own clinic size.
4. Attendees will understand the impacts and benefits of positive distraction on the medical outcomes of pediatric patients.

 

Sponored By:

ROOM F
Monday, December 6
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

F01: Intuitive Design Workshop Part 1

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Gregory Splinter AIA
Co-founder and Partner, Yowza Architects

This real-time, highly participatory, experiential, and interactive workshop provides the opportunity for each participant to access their deep inner wisdom by creating their own intuitive drawing and interpreting their drawing through an immersive experience facilitated by Gregory. Each participant will create and keep a drawing that they have made as a reminder of the interpretation of their experience.

 

Materials will be provided and no prior drawing experience is necessary. Note that this is a double session  with a 15-minute break.  See: www.generativespaceweek.net, click ‘About Us’, and scroll down to see images of drawings from previous Intuitive Design Workshops by Gregory.

 

Previous comments from participants include:

Gregory's method of ‘Intuitive Design’ explicitly recognizes the deep truth about imaginative creation that all great artists, architects, and even scientists have known - namely, that buildings, artworks, and new ideas have a kind of independent existence, even before they become manifest in the external world.

 

Gregory’s ‘Intuitive Design Workshop’ was an eye-opening and mind-expanding exercise in pure creativity with nearly no restrictions, stress, or pressure to ‘get it right.’. Relaxed with dream-like music, while rubbing vibrant pastels against midnight black palettes, our ideas flowed, and colors glowed like neon against the dark void. Our presentations to our non-judgmental peers were a cathartic expression of soul-searching and shared empathy.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Explore how to access deep unconscious to generate alternative planning and design solutions.
2. Learn to draw images, independent of conventional logic, to provide a source for new design solutions. 3. Discover how to interpret these images and translate them into practical planning and design solutions. 4. Discuss how to maintain the fidelity and integrity of the images as they become translated into effective client-responsive planning and design solutions.

11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

F02: Intuitive Design Workshop Part 2

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Gregory Splinter AIA
Co-founder and Partner, Yowza Architects

This real-time, highly participatory, experiential, and interactive workshop provides the opportunity for each participant to access their deep inner wisdom by creating their own intuitive drawing and interpreting their drawing through an immersive experience facilitated by Gregory. Each participant will create and keep a drawing that they have made as a reminder of the interpretation of their experience.

 

Materials will be provided and no prior drawing experience is necessary. Note that this is a double session  with a 15-minute break.  See: www.generativespaceweek.net, click ‘About Us’, and scroll down to see images of drawings from previous Intuitive Design Workshops by Gregory.

 

Previous comments from participants include:

Gregory's method of ‘Intuitive Design’ explicitly recognizes the deep truth about imaginative creation that all great artists, architects, and even scientists have known - namely, that buildings, artworks, and new ideas have a kind of independent existence, even before they become manifest in the external world.

 

Gregory’s ‘Intuitive Design Workshop’ was an eye-opening and mind-expanding exercise in pure creativity with nearly no restrictions, stress, or pressure to ‘get it right.’. Relaxed with dream-like music, while rubbing vibrant pastels against midnight black palettes, our ideas flowed, and colors glowed like neon against the dark void. Our presentations to our non-judgmental peers were a cathartic expression of soul-searching and shared empathy.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Explore how to access deep unconscious to generate alternative planning and design solutions.
2. Learn to draw images, independent of conventional logic, to provide a source for new design solutions. 3. Discover how to interpret these images and translate them into practical planning and design solutions. 4. Discuss how to maintain the fidelity and integrity of the images as they become translated into effective client-responsive planning and design solutions. 

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

F03: Healthcare Providers Only Roundtable Part I

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Sean Collins, AIA, LEED AP
Executive Director, Facilities Planning, Design and Construction, CEDARS-SINAI
 
Lynn Murphy
Associate Vice President, UK HealthCare Facilities Planning
 
David J. Vitka, R.A., M. Arch, M.B.A.
Vice President, Facility Planning, Design & Construction, Catholic Health
 
Donna Ware
Executive Director, Planning and Design, BJC HealthCare

For the third year, we are offering the Healthcare Providers Only Roundtable.  The purpose of this roundtable is to create an environment for individuals employed by a hospital or healthcare system who oversee capital construction projects to gather and openly exchange ideas.

In past years, we have discussed the following topics: 

  • Departmental organizational structure and administration 
  • Departmental services and standards
  • Management of information
  • Professional services, contracts and project execution
  • Department organization; staffing metrics; relationships with other departments
  • Standards – what, why and how; role in branding
  • Diversity & Inclusion – what are people doing with their consultants; do you have a program

This year we are looking for input from healthcare providers on topics they would like to discuss.


This session will run from 1:45 pm to 4:00 pm with no break.


This session will only be open to those attendees employed by hospitals or health care systems. Information on how to sign up for this session will be sent to paid registrants who are employed by a hospital or health care system. If you have any questions please email jenabeth@jdevents.com

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

F04: Healthcare Providers Only Roundtable Part II

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Sean Collins, AIA, LEED AP
Executive Director, Facilities Planning, Design and Construction, CEDARS-SINAI
 
Lynn Murphy
Associate Vice President, UK HealthCare Facilities Planning
 
Donna Ware
Executive Director, Planning and Design, BJC HealthCare
 
David J. Vitka, R.A., M. Arch, M.B.A.
Vice President, Facility Planning, Design & Construction, Catholic Health

For the third year, we are offering the Healthcare Providers Only Roundtable.  The purpose of this roundtable is to create an environment for individuals employed by a hospital or healthcare system who oversee capital construction projects to gather and openly exchange ideas.

In past years, we have discussed the following topics: 

  • Departmental organizational structure and administration 
  • Departmental services and standards
  • Management of information
  • Professional services, contracts and project execution
  • Department organization; staffing metrics; relationships with other departments
  • Standards – what, why and how; role in branding
  • Diversity & Inclusion – what are people doing with their consultants; do you have a program

This year we are looking for input from healthcare providers on topics they would like to discuss.

This session will run from 1:45 pm to 4:00 pm with no break.

This session will only be open to those attendees employed by hospitals or health care systems. Information on how to sign up for this session will be sent to paid registrants who are employed by a hospital or health care system. If you have any questions please email jenabeth@jdevents.com

Tuesday, December 7
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

F05: Navigating Reinvestment in Inpatient Psychiatric Beds

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Cindy Beckham
Principal / Mental Health Planner, SmithGroup
 
Gary Fischer
Project Manager, Veterans Health Administration
 
Arash Irani
Associate / Healthcare Planner and Strategist, SmithGroup
 
Vladislav Torskiy, MHA, ACHE, AORN, IAIA, Lean Healthcare CP
Health and Wellness Practice Leader, ProgressiveAE

The decline of psych beds and mental health services has impacted communities across the U.S. with state facilities losing more than half a million beds in the past 50 years. The cost to maintain a 24 hour inpatient psych bed has forced organizations to shift services away from acute and tertiary settings into residential treatment centers. The social impact of state facility closures has put a burden on community hospitals, families and the prison systems. The lack of available data and regulation of services provide a roadblock to healthcare architects and planners. This session provides an overview of the national psych bed landscape, the regulatory environment and how other countries are dealing with these issues. We will explore benchmarks, best practices, goals and solutions for healthcare planners. Using the Veterans Admin. as a case study we will demonstrate how established need can be translated into appropriately planned and designed facilities.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understanding mental health services changing environment: inpatient, residential and state psych bed landscape, and its impact on communities
2. Mental health beds and services forecasting in response to population health needs
3. Understanding mental health services categories and institutional rational in mental health services administration
4. How to translate planning into design

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

F06: Creating Better Project Outcomes Through the Active Engagement of the Construction Team - The Art of the Skill

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Susan Black
Principal and Director, Perkins Eastman Black Architects Inc
 
Eric Groat
Operations Manager, Robins & Morton
 
Bruce Komiske, MHA, FACHE
Owner, Komiske Consulting LLC
 
Annette Ridenour
President & Founder, Aesthetics Inc

Like a great symphony, healthcare projects require the coordinated efforts of a vast assembly of highly skilled professionals to transform visions into reality.  From the absolute beginning, the entire team - from the CEO and staff to construction professionals and the community - must be fully engaged and open to new ideas and perspectives and appreciate each other’s unique talents.  What is often underrepresented on many projects is the importance of the engagement and appreciation of the construction craftworkers.  When this engagement occurs conscientiously, outcomes for project participants and long-term beneficiaries are improved.  This is the essence of Generative Space.

 

This participatory panel presentation will include project examples by each of the panelists, group discussion, and Q+A.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  1. Learn how healthcare outcomes can be improved through project approaches that encourage inclusion, engagement, and appreciation.
  2. Learn how to appreciate that each person is an artisan in their own profession, skill, or trade.
  3. Learn how this approach motivates people to utilize their discretionary abilities.
  4. Learn about how the engagement of skilled trades people can positively impact the financial performance of healthcare organizations.
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

F07: Right Care, Right Place, Right Time: Neighborhood Access Points

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Olivia Fritts, PhD, MS
Chief Administrative Officer, Covider Health
James Hutchinson, MBA, RN, CEN
President, Covider Health
Renee Kubesh
Senior Project Manager : Associate, Eppstein Uhen Architects (EUA)
Isaac Larson
Executive of Enterprise Facility Service, Froedtert Health

Every year Healthcare delivery evolves, accelerated by pressures for consumer convenience, service line efficiency and a desire to expand market share. Accessible retail settings achieve multiple goals; establishing brand presence, building awareness of services, bringing new patients into the system and appeasing consumer preferences. Small-scale stand-alone solutions offer neighborhood access points to differentiate and meet demands. Micro hospitals allow health systems to expand quickly and efficiently, while bringing acute care to communities in a bite sized package, but are they the right solution for your organization? In this collaborative presentation experts from Froedtert and the Medical College of Wisconsin, Covider Health and Eppstein Uhen Architects (EUA) will discuss the micro hospital's role in the neighborhood access point evolution; reviewing benefits, important positioning elements, development and delivery options and the key components to a successful project.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn about the ways neighborhood hospital access points are being used to support system reach as a portfolio expansion and diversification tool.
2. Gain insight on the various models and options for neighborhood access deployment, and considerations for each development type.
3. Learn about the key components and must haves for a successful micro hospital implementation.
4. Learn about common pitfalls to avoid when pursuing this facility type.

4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

F08: Integrating Technology to Enhance Patient and Family Experience

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Michael D. Aubin, FACHE
Hospital President, Wolfson Children's Hospital
 
Cicely D. Brooks, MSN, RN, C-EFM, NE-BC, FABC
Vice President, Patient Care Services and Chief Nurse Executive, Wolfson Children's Hospital and Baptist Medical Center Jacksonville
 
Franklin H. Brooks, AIA, ACHA
Client Executive, FreemanWhite
 
Margaret Cervantes, AIA, EDAC, LEED AP.
Creative Lead, Philips Healthcare

Faced with growing need for critical care for neonatal and pediatric patients, Wolfson Children's Hospital in Jacksonville is expanding its NICU and PICU services with a new, seven-story 100+-bed tower. Technology will play a crucial role in bringing these vulnerable patients back to health and enhancing the experience of patients' families. Each new patient room will integrate EMR tools to manage patient charts, results, and procedures; a network that enhances patient engagement, including parent education and entertainment modules; and a dashboard of predictive analytics that flags areas of concern in treatments. In addition, the rooms feature design elements to control environmental factors that affect patients' health, as well as areas for families to stay together. This session will explore the technologies available for use in the NICU, how they can improve patients' outcomes, promote family involvement in care, and improve the experience for both patients and their families.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understand how the goals and vision have translated into defined solutions and Key Performance Indicators for the new NICU
2. Implement environmental design elements such as cycle lighting and sound buffering in critical care
3. Develop an optimized clinical and experiential service blueprint for a family-centered and state-of-the-art NICU
4. Evaluate the technology available for NICUs to improve clinical outcomes, including a NICU Analytics Platform for clinical decision-making and enhanced tools for parent engagement