Conference By Track

KEYNOTES

Monday, September 18, 2017  |  8:30 AM - 9:45 AM

Welcome Ceremony & Opening Keynote Marika Shioiri-Clark

SPEAKERS
 
Marika Shioiri-Clark
Principal, SOSHL Studio

Join us to kick off your 2017 Symposium with our opening ceremonies and keynote. Marika Shioiri-Clark will inspire you and motivate you to push yourself.

 

Marika Shioiri-Clark is a thoroughly modern personification of ‘think global, act local.’ A designer and architect, she works under the auspices of SOSHL Studio with organizations like the Nike Foundation in Nigeria and Ethiopia and IDEO.org and DFID in India. She also works on neighborhood development and creative placemaking in the Hingetown neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio, where she lives in an old firehouse that still has three poles. Marika cut her teeth helping to design the acclaimed Butaro Hospital in northern Rwanda, as a co-founder of MASS Design Group, in collaboration with Partners in Health. The hospital has repeatedly been written up in The New York Times and identified as a game changer in architecture and design globally. Not bad for your first project out of (or, actually, still in) design school.

 

Like her designs, Marika’s delivery in front of an audience is remarkably humble and human-centered. She’s one of those rare geniuses who somehow makes everyone else feel smart. But don’t expect a pushover; Marika is refreshingly unafraid of intellectual debate and fierce about the future of design.

KEYNOTES

Tuesday, September 19, 2017  |  7:00 AM - 8:00 AM

Sunrise Plenary: Alignment of Priorities for Health Care Design

MODERATOR
 
Vincent Della Donna AIA, ACHA
President Elect, AIA Academy of Architecture for Health
SPEAKERS
 
Peter Bardwell, FAIA, FACHA
Principal-in-Charge, BARDWELL+associates
 
Chad E. Beebe, AIA CHFM, CFPS, CBO, FASHE
Deputy Executive Director of Advocacy, ASHE
 
Patrick M. Casey
Executive Director - Office of Planning, Design, and Construction, University of Mississippi Medical Center
Gerry Kaiser, PE
Senior Director, Facilities Resource Group, Ascension Health
 
Mark A. Nichols, AIA FACHA LEED AP
Principal, Eckenhoff Saunders Architects
 
Bradley R. Taylor, MBA, CHFM, CHC
System Vice President, Construction and Project Management, Fairview Health Services

The session will be an interactive polling and panel session to discuss the future of health care design regarding population health and value based care and their affect on the future hospital campus. This session is envisioned to be a multiple part series that will compare results from different demographics and their thoughts on the future of healthcare.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

 

1. Determine the direction of health care by audience participation (on-demand text polling)
2. Discuss the polling results with an expert panel live
3. Compare polling results from other demographics to determine alignment of priorities and principles
4. Through the results of the polling, a comparative study will be made that will identify the common goals and directions of the industry.

KEYNOTES

Tuesday, September 19, 2017  |  9:15 AM - 10:30 AM

Keynote

Please check back in June for our keynote to be announced.

KEYNOTES

Wednesday, September 20, 2017  |  11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

The Solidification and Final Destination of American Healthcare

SPEAKERS
 
Marc Sauvé LEAN MBA
VP Healthcare / Director of Strategic Planning, Gresham Smith & Partners

The final destination of America’s healthcare system is vividly clear. The political smokescreen by both parties can no longer hide the cost increases and socioeconomic damage. Sauvé frames the magnitude of change required for a balanced budget and generational commitment ahead. The megatrends of true consumerism, big data and virtual care connectivity are driving us to tomorrow’s delivery model. Mergers and acquisitions continue to seek cost reductions through economies of scale, delivery networks are expanding through retail clinics and freestanding EDs. Today’s master plans are complex endeavors, as systems rationalize services across a region. True physician partnerships and new leadership skillsets are required to navigate this politically volatile landscape. Effective teams require cultural cohesion across four generations of employees. This smart, data-rich and entertaining presentation frames market forces, cultural shifts and technology drivers of tomorrow’s healthcare system.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
 
1.  Experience a data-rich and entertaining presentation as Marc frames a comprehensive vision of America’s healthcare future.
2.  Assess the latest innovations and technology advancements transforming care delivery from retrospective and reactive to personalized and predictive.
3.  Understand the complexity, political sensitivity & workforce implications of master planning as systems seek to rationalize services across a region.
4.  Follow the money, from our trillion dollar, healthcare-driven, national debt to root causes, wasteful practices& proven solutions in value-based care.
Room One
Monday, September 18, 2017
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

A01: Building Healing Environments: A Clinical and Operational Town Hall Discussion on Construction Cross Contamination Risks and the Impact on the Patient Population

Open to Conference Attendees Only

MODERATOR
 
Jessica Gutierrez-Rodriguez
Hospital CEO, Texas Center for Infectious Disease
SPEAKERS
 
Marlene Linders, RN MS AIA
Executive Director for The Linders Health Institute, President and CEO Philders Group Intl Inc
 
John Wilson, AIA, CHFM, SASHE
Director Planning, Design and Construction, Parkland Health and Hospital System

The purpose of this session is to address the serious issue of Infection Control Risk Assessment as it pertains to the professional working in the healthcare environment. Attendees will learn about the various high risk quadrants in the hospital setting, vulnerable patient populations, and employee exposure risks during real work time in construction. After the presentation, the audience will be encouraged to participate, share, ask opinions of the SME (subject matter expert) panelists about their projects, experiences on projects, risk assessments, best practices and any area of concern.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

 

1.  Learn how the modified Joint Commission inspections and NFPA Code updates are affecting compliance.
2.  Understand the importance of integrating operational, clinical and project development teams for overall facility construction safety.
3.  Case study example illustrating the importance of communication and construction sequencing.
4.  Eliminate information silos and foster team engagement.  Who should participate in the Environment of Care discussions?

11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

A02: Big Data & Integrated Partnerships: Innovative Tools for Health Systems

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Kevin W. Barr
Senior Vice President, Bon Secours Health System, Inc.
 
Charles Black
Chief Executive Officer, Real Estate Strategies, Inc.
 
Tala Matchett
Director of Business Development, Hoar Construction

In this highly interactive and visually rich session, the speakers will showcase the power of big data, predictive analytics, and integrated partnerships for creating, approving, and implementing Ambulatory Network Strategic Plans before opportunities disappear. The audience will be immersed in a case study highlighting Bon Secours Health System’s journey from Strategy Creation and Approval through Site Selection, Design & Construction.

 

Imagine utilizing predictive analytics and interactive mapping to quickly identify unsaturated market areas full of unmet patient demand, overlaying ideal payer mix projections, and forecasting the future financial success of new location long before a site has even been identified.

 

This session is intended for Healthcare Executives, Strategic Network Planners, Architects, Contractors, Program Managers, and anyone else interested in seeing the latest innovations and best practices in Strategic Planning, Site Selection, Design, & Construction.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

 

1.  Can best practices from retail or other industries, including the use of “big data” and predictive analytics, be applied to Ambulatory Network Strategic Planning?
2.  What is the best way to build the confidence and consensus necessary for investment approval so expansion including Site Selection, Design, & Construction activities can commence?
3.  What innovative construction tools and techniques can help providers capitalize on opportunities with greater speed to market and increased consistency in meeting project cost targets.
4.  How can the various 3rd party partners across the spectrum of needs be seamlessly integrated in a way that creates efficient ambulatory networks and facilities of the future?
5.  How can I elevate my strategic acumen to introduce innovative tools and techniques to help systems achieve their mission and deliver more convenient care to their community?

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

A03: 3P, or not 3P: That is the question

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Drew Garst, AIA, LEED AP BD+C
Principal, Boulder Associates Architects
 
Veronica Tolley, MHA
Assistant Vice President, CCPN Primary and Specialty Services, Cook Children's Physician Network

Prior sessions have sought to demonstrate the benefits of a 3P, full]scale mock]up, simulation]based design process. The long]term value and return on investment benefits of the 3P to healthcare administrators has been less documented. This presentation will compare impacts of the 3P on two parallel Cook Children’s Hospital projects, one which utilized 3P, and one which did not, by evaluating evidence across the project life cycle including design, construction and post]occupancy phases. These two simultaneously constructed clinics were identical in size, program and client thereby eliminating many confounding variables. The presenters will discuss how the application of this comparative case study can inform the development of a 3P assessment instrument suitable for evaluating long]term benefits.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
 
1.  Describe long]term macro benefits associated with 3P across the project lifecycle
2.  Identify potential metrics for evaluating impacts of a 3P during design, construction and occupancy phases
3.  Compare data across projects to establish potential areas of impact associated with 3P Learning
4.  Apply findings to develop a 3P assessment instrument
3:15 PM - 4:15 PM

A04: 2018 Guidelines Update –Changes to Keep Pace with Clinical Practices

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKER
 
Douglas Erickson, FASHE, CHFM, HFDP, CHC
CEO, Facility Guidelines Institute

The FGI Guidelines for Design and Construction documents are the design standards most often employed by medical planners, designers, and owners of hospitals and outpatient facilities. Authorities having jurisdiction (AHJs) in 35 states enforce some edition of the Guidelines, but even states that haven’t adopted the documents often refer to them to determine their own minimum standards.

This session highlights key changes and the factors that influenced them in the forthcoming 2018 Guidelines. Requirements have changed for recovery spaces; imaging, procedure, and operating rooms; and satellite sterile processing spaces in hospitals and outpatient facilities. Learn how these and other revisions may affect the planning and design of new construction and major renovation projects. This session will also review the Health Guidelines Revision Committee’s efforts to remove outdated requirements, clear up conflicts, and employ cost/benefit analysis in determining the final language.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Explain the reasoning behind changes to the design of clinical spaces in health care facilities.
2. Represent how using the updated Guidelines for a project can provide a safe and effective patient care environment at a reasonable cost.
3. Discuss how FGI is reinventing its process to more rigorously examine, balance, and document its requirements based on best available evidence.
4. Describe strategies used by FGI to develop and enhance new content for 2018.

Tuesday, September 19, 2017
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

A05: Evolution of Climate Change Law & Implications for Healthcare Design

Open to Conference Attendees Only

In 2016, it seemed likely that the United States would be implementing the Clean Power Plan, and follow through on the historic Paris Climate Treaties. At the time of this writing, the new government is only coming into focus, and our early understandings is that the response by them will be considerably different than that of the previous administration. Economic and other forces continue to play out, creating realities on the ground. More important, regional, state, and city governments, as well as courts and quasi- and non-governmental rule-making bodies are creating bodies of regulation in response to both mitigation and adaptation needs, many of which are only indirectly impactful for the design of healthcare facilities, but many of which are directly relevant. A brief survey of the streams of climate change law, and an update on current state of these laws and ways in which forces of economics and natural forces will start to intersect in ways that affect healthcare design.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn about international climate regulations, and how their evolution will affect healthcare design in the US
2. Learn about Federal developments in the arena of climate change law, and how their evolution will affect healthcare design in the US.
3. Learn about state level developments in the area of climate change law, and how their evolution will affect healthcare design in the US.
4. Learn about city and non-governmental sources of climate change law, and how their evolution will affect healthcare design in the US.

12:45 PM - 2:00 PM

A06: Convenient Care: The Retail Healthcare Experience

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Trish Adelman, IIDA, EDAC
Director of Healthcare - Interiors, tvsdesign
 
Kathy Durflinger, RN, MBA
Vice President, CNO, Avita Health System
 
Julie Ford
Director of Project Management, CBRE Healthcare Solutions Group
 
Daniel Montaño SEGD,LEED AP
Partner, Creative Director of Brand Experience Studio, Little
 
Candice Roth, MSN, RN
Assistant Vice President, Central Region Operations, Nursing & Quality, Levine Cancer Institute, Carolinas HealthCare System
 
Andrew von Lohr, AIA, NCARB
Principal, Trinity Planning Design Architecture
MODERATOR
 
Deb D'Agostino FACHE, EDAC
Senior Project Manager, CBRE/Healthcare

Three case studies – from three different communities – highlight the emergence of Retail Healthcare as a competitive advantage. This panel discussion will explore the application of established real estate techniques such as using experiential and demographic research to drive site selection. The panel will also discuss the importance site selection to drive market share.

Panelists will identify the challenges and advantages inherent in the adaptive reuse of existing retail space. After recounting their own experiences, we expect all panelists will agree: retail healthcare offers an opportunity to create a dynamic brand experience in a casual environment

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

 

1. Understand how to adopt the retail “experience” for healthcare
2. Learn to use research demographics and reimbursement to drive site selection
3. Gain insight into the effective use of a commercial floorplate
4. Recognize how to communicate brand and values through design

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

A07: Attracting millennial clinicians – design to recruit and retain talent

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Brian Henry
Clinical Instructor of Surgery and Clinical Practice Physician, The University of Vermont Medical Center
 
Regan Henry, Phd, AIA, LEED AP, LSSBB
Research Director, Environments for Health

Statistics show there is a disconnect between millennial clinicians’ expectations and what options are available in today’s healthcare job market. This disconnect is illustrated through the increasing rates of turnover of hospital staff across the United States. In 2016 the national rate of Registered Nurse turnover was 17.1% annually. Physician retention is no better. The aggregate turnover rate for Physicians in the first three years of employment is 25%. High clinician turnover is a problem for many health systems as it impacts both the consistency and quality of care and is a considerable financial expense. With the rate of baby boomer retirement on the rise, the need to attract and retain new talent will only intensify. For these reasons, there is a credible business case for focusing energy on the retention of millennial clinicians through the design of new spaces and programs tailored to meet their needs and lifestyle.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Identify the delta between expectations of millennial clinicians and the existing opportunities in healthcare employment
2. Explore ways in which a health system may design facilities and develop programs to attract and retain millennial clinicians
3. Investigate the business case for focusing energy and money on the design of facilities and programs to attract and retain millennial clinicians
4. Review examples of best practices in design and analyze for how they respond to millennial expectations

4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

A08: Horticultural Therapy in a Behavioral Healthcare Setting

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Deana Grall CTRS
Recreational Therapist, Rogers Memorial Hospital
 
Geoffrey Roehll ASLA
Senior Vice President, Hitchcock Design Group

Rogers Memorial Hospital’s Oconomowoc campus is focused on providing behavioral health services for a wide variety of clients and patients. As part of its ongoing mission to provide comprehensive treatment options, the hospital incorporated a therapeutic garden into its campus. The purpose of the garden was to create a safe, but interactive environment for patients that would allow them to connect with nature and in turn, help facilitate their achieving goals that are outlined in their treatment. This session will focus on how a custom design was created for the garden that supported the vision of the hospital for the garden and how the garden has been incorporated into their established program.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Participants will understand the benefits of including a therapeutic garden in a healthcare setting.
2. Participants will learn the best practices for design a therapeutic garden in a behavioral health setting.
3. Participants will be given practical examples of how a therapeutic garden can be utilized at a behavioral health facility achieve goals and results.
4. Participants will understand the positive and negative implications of incorporating a therapeutic garden into their sites.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017
8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

A09: Re-envisioning the Food Service as a Hospital Amenity and Destination

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Christine Guyott
, Rippe Associates Food Service Design + Consulting
 
Jim Posey
Director Food and Nutrition Services, St. David's Medical Center
 
Craig Puccetti, AIA, EDAC
Director of Architecture Austin, BSA Lifestructures
 
Julie Schneider
Interior Designer, BSA Lifestructures

This case study and multifaceted presentation will take you through a project journey from inception to completion. The session will discuss the initial challenges that aging hospitals are faced with on a daily basis and areas or transformation that can create a dramatic impact and increase patient, family and staff satisfaction and experience with a facility. Transforming the aging hospital by re-envisioning the food service as a hospital amenity and destination will explore new concepts in food service delivery, servery configurations, dining rooms and kitchen design. The old design style is being rethought to deliver high quality and nutritious food and a quality environment that helps to foster healing and heighten experience and perception of the facility. The session gives an architect and interior design perspective of food Service and facility design. It will demonstrate how a long outdated facility was reinvented that includes design solutions examples and lessons learned.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Assess ways to approach initial inception of project objectives and programming
2. Evaluation of food service design strategies
3. Understanding of facility side concerns and goals
4. Understanding of design interventions, successes and post occupancy outcomes

9:45 AM - 10:45 AM

A10: Maximizing Profitability in an Active Hospital Surgical Floor Renovation

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Matt Franklin
Vice President, Project Manager, HKS, Inc
 
Eric Rasmussen
Project Manager, DPR Construction
 
Robert H. Reardon CHFM
Chief Facility Officer, Virginia Commonwealth University Health System
MODERATOR
 
Mouji Linarez-Castillo
Healthcare Core Market Leader, DPR Construction

The renovation of a busy perioperative services floor in an active hospital faces a variety of design and construction challenges that can jeopardize the facility’s bottom line. Although surgical procedures constitute only 11% of a hospital’s volume, it generates 40% of the profits. Surgical site infections derived from unplanned construction impacts can double the hospital's cost of treatment. Learn how the VCU project team expertly planned a multi-phased, 80,000-sq.-ft. perioperative services renovation that transformed the entire floor including 18 operating rooms, two hybrid ORs, an MRI suite, and 5th floor bump out waiting area – all without impacting surgical operations. Landlocked in the heart of a busy urban medical center, strict infection control procedures and innovative phasing allowed the hospital to maintain full surgical operations without compromising patient care or profitability on this logistically challenging project.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Discuss VCUHS’s business case for renovating their perioperative services without impacting surgeons’ volumes or jeopardizing patient safety.
2. Learn how our team maintained surgical operations while renovating the perioperative services floor, preserving patient care and VCUHS' profitability.
3. Learn phasing strategies to move a perioperative transformation project forward without impacting FTEs, patient flow, patient safety, or patient care.
4. Discuss lessons learned on replacing aging infrastructure, team communication, and coordinating owner equipment selections.

Room Two
Monday, September 18, 2017
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

B01: Patients and Family Advisors, a RX for effective programming and design.

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Raman Krimpuri, MD, MBA
Research Fellow, Patient and Family Advisory Council Co-Chair, The MetroHealth System
 
Jennifer Lastic
Program Coordinator - Office of Patient Experience, The MetroHealth System
 
Kevin Ortner PMP, EDAC, Procsi
Director, Transformation Operations and Transition, The MetroHealth System
 
Kate Renner, Associate, AIA, EDAC, Lean-Six Sigma
Architect and Researcher, HKS, Inc.

With the sponsorship and assistance from the hospital's Patient Advisory Council and Patient Experience Office, MetroHealth embarked on the construction of their new Critical Care Pavilion with one primary goal in mind, an excellent patient experience. Patients and family members of the hospital's critical care units joined the project's planning and programming team at the project's kick off meeting and remained involved throughout the design, construction, occupancy and post occupancy review phases of the new pavilion construction effort. An overview of the Patient Advisory Council, the recruitment and selection process of patients and family members, the tools and techniques that were used during the project, examples of the team's contributions and key responses that reflect that through the collective efforts of the patients, family members and staff, MetroHealth achieved its goal of creating an excellent patient experience.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
1.  Provide an overview of patient advisory councils and the patient and family member identification and selection process.
2.  Introduce tools and techniques that can be used to incorporate patients and family members into the programming and design of new environments
3.  Share observations of how guiding principles were defined and how ideas, questions and concerns were discussed and addressed throughout the project
4.  Provide examples of the roles the patients and family members played during the activation and post occupancy phases of the project.

11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

B02: A Lean journey @ the Forefront of Medicine: diversity, inclusion, success

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Joan Archie
Executive Director, Construction Compliance and Business Diversity, University of Chicago Medicine
 
Joel Klahn
Director of Operations, Executive, Leopardo Companies Inc
 
Anthony Tysinger
Project Executive, Gilbane Building Company

3 projects are presented to illustrate one institution’s journey to better decision making, team member respect/collaboration and achieving desired, predictable outcomes. 3 projects, $150 million, 24 months: an off-campus state of the art Medical Office Building, an on-campus (but off-stage) repurpose of a parking garage shell space to a level 1 trauma center and a massive shell space fit-out conversion to patient bed floors in a fully functioning vertically oriented replacement hospital. During the course of 24 months, the University of Chicago Medicine has gone from IPD “like” project delivery to a very real, Lean, integrated project decision making environment that leveraged lean principals while retaining key past practices to insure that project success can be measured in the following ways: team collaboration, timely decision making, quality outcomes, schedule achievement, cost containment, and diversity/inclusion of the work force.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
 
1.  Establishing a frame work for developing and implementing a genuine diversity and inclusion program - Lean and IPD can leverage diversity.
2.  Leverage Lean principles and practices across the PDC project spectrum – why you have to honest about decisions and direction
3.  Effecting schedule compression without team member “casualties” or going bankrupt
4.  Project Life in the Big Room – why a central team space is essential to collaborative, integrated success
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

B03: Servicing the Underserviced: Design Considerations for Suburban and Freestanding Emergency Departments

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Jacqualyn Anderson MGA BSN RN NE-BC
Director - Emergency Services, Baystate Medical Center
 
Robert Danner
Director of Healthcare Operations, TLC Engineering for Architecture
 
Kimberly Davis RN MSN CCRN CEN
Nurse Manager Emergency Services, Baystate Health Eastern Region
Rebeccah S. Eldridge AIA
Project Manager Facilities Planning & Engineering, Baystate Medical Center
 
Steve Jackson LEED BD+C
Director of Project Development Southeast, Flad Architects
 
Karri L. May AIA LEED AP BD+C
Senior Associate, Steffian Bradley Architects
 
Jacob Nagib
Director of Planning Design Engineering & Construction, Halifax Health Medical Center
MODERATOR
 
Neal Boothe PE
Associate/Senior Electrical Engineer, TLC Engineering for Architecture
Community EDs face the challenge of serving patients with a wide range of conditions requiring specialty care with a smaller budget than large urban hospitals.  Similarly, freestanding EDs are becoming a common method of urban hospitals reaching out of their normal service areas to serve smaller communities.  This session will address challenges of providing high quality emergency care to smaller communities and how two different systems addressed these problems.  In one case, this involved an ED addition project at a community hospital  for Baystate Health in Palmer, Massachusetts.  In the second example, Halifax Health of Daytona Beach, Florida reached out of their normal service area to construct a freestanding ED (with plans to transition this to a full hospital in the future).
 
LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Identify the range of specialized patient care spaces to build while still considering budget in a Suburban ED addition project.
2. Discover operational efficiencies to improve patient and staff experience in a suburban ED environment.
3. Understand how to provide better clinical care and convenience outside of a healthcare system’s typical service area.
4. Learn to think and plan to transition a freestanding ED to a hospital while serving a new community.
3:15 PM - 4:15 PM

B04: ED Design Considerations – Two Different Approaches to Workflow to Improve Patient Care While Reducing Patient Wait Times

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
John D'Angelo MD FACEP
Senior Vice President and Executive Director, Northwell Health
 
Benjamin Earls LEED AP
Associate, GBBN Architects
 
Robert Masters II AIA NCARB LEED AP
Principal, CannonDesign
 
Erin Schmidt, IIDA, NCIDQ, LEED AP ID+C
Interior Designer, GBBN Architects
Kartik Varadarajan
Sr. Special Project Manager Emergency Services, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
MODERATOR
 
Neal Boothe PE
Associate/Senior Electrical Engineer, TLC Engineering for Architecture
Likely all emergency departments nationwide face the same struggle – providing quality emergency care with limited resources in EDs that never seem large enough.  This session will provide examples of how two projects addressed these challenges.  In one case, Northwell Health implemented a new “Super Track” clinical model was retrofitted into several EDs to manage wait times and reduce patient length of stays via an acuity-based split flow concept.  This led to a 15% reduction in door-to-door provider times and a 42% rise in volume over a 2-year period.  In a second example, the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Emergency Department team explored new work flow models balancing emerging trends  while staying focused on delivering best in class patient care.  In the process, this team employed a variety of techniques throughout the concept planning and design process.  The resulting ED utilizes a model that engages patients and their families while breaking down the silos amongst the care team.
 
LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Present data to support the value of a “Super Track” split-flow approach in emergency departments as an effective LEAN process redesign strategy.
2. Reference implemented strategies showing how design can impact throughput, length of stay,  patient experience, and quality outcomes in the ED.
3. Learn the techniques used to prioritize patient experience and operational modifications in concert with a limited scope renovation
4. Hear about the value analysis of an interim renovation and its impact on future hospital projects.
 
Tuesday, September 19, 2017
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

B05: A High-Performance and Sustainable Repurposing of the Aging Facility

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Gino Ciatola
Project Manager, Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
 
Daniel McKelvey, AIA, LEED BD+C, NIBS
Associate Principal, Ayers Saint Gross Architects
 
Allison Wilson, AIA, LEED BD+C
Associate, Ayers Saint Gross Architects
 
Roger Zook
Project Executive, Johns Hopkins Health System

Health-care facility managers are confronted by an increasing inventory of aging building stock and face the difficult decision on whether to remove these buildings and build new, re-purpose, or relocate operations. Hospital administrators particularly are reluctant to remove their aging existing structures due to the often limited availability of open areas to erect new buildings and because in many instances the existing facility must remain fully, or partially, operational. This presentation documents the complete renovation of a 70's era critical care building at Johns Hopkins Hospital while maintaining hospital operations throughout the construction phase. The highlight is an innovative approach that developed a high-performance, hybrid envelope system that results in a modern hospital design aesthetic that is highly energy efficient, environmentally sustainable, and improves building resiliency for decades to come.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Be able to better assess the code implications related to designing a new exterior enclosure on existing infrastructure to inform design decisions.
2. Appreciate the role that analysis and CAD technology plays in assessing, coordinating, and implementing design strategies for new enclosure design.
3. Examine the impact of design decisions on constructability related to cladding materials, fenestration, roofing and insulation of a new enclosure.
4. Understand strategies to future proof buildings through innovative design systems that address enclosure performance and sustainability objectives.

12:45 PM - 2:00 PM

B06: Relieving the Stress of Pediatric Emergency Care

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Stuart Baur AIA
Associate Principal, Payette
 
Darcy Daniels
Family Advisory Council, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children
 
Karen Robichaud
Director of Creative Engagement, Payette

Designing for the health and welfare of those who live, work and play in our spaces extends beyond physical spaces. This includes designing better experiences. Working with a family who wrote a short story explaining what to expect when visiting the Emergency Department, one team of architects worked to translate the written word into a multi-media story. This project offers relief during a stressful and chaotic time, giving children insight into their healthcare experience. As healthcare architects, we bring a clear understanding how space works, but we can do more to foster community and promote patient well-being. Producing a video allowed our team to build skills and push our creativity, unlocking innovative ways to connect and communicate with our clients. This session offers insight from the design team and the family on how we can use our skills to develop unique products and presentations which help promote multimedia-driven stress relief to benefit the patient experience.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Identify opportunities to alleviate patient stress through multimedia projects.
2. Learn how to recognize opportunities to engage the patient community and healthcare owners in innovative ways.
3. Learn how non-traditional design challenges can be used to expand & improve skill sets that are increasingly common in large architectural practices.
4. Identify ways to apply design thinking and problem solving to improving the patient experience.

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

B07: Optimizing the outpatient clinic: strategies for a more efficient operation

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Steven G. Jacobson, AIA, Lean Six Sigma CE, LEED AP
Principal, Midwest Regional Director, HKS, Inc
 
Patricia Modrowski RN
VP of Operations, ProMedica Health System
 
Tyler Schwede, EDAC
Designer, Medical Planner and Researcher, HKS, Inc

Healthcare is undergoing a paradigm shift. There is an urgent need to investigate the changing expectations from clinics and how the design community has to position itself. This session will present the findings from the year-long study that aimed to better understand the impact the physical environment has on productivity and throughput, the relationship between facility design, human experience and organizational efficiency in the outpatient setting A case study was used to test the hypothesis: Can architecture impact patient Throughput? The study was conducted in 2 parts, a pre and post occupancy analysis of 4 clinics that were planned to move into a new consolidated building. Reported, observed, and spatial data were analyzed together to understand the patterns that emerged The new building combined 11 practices from buildings across the city into one, a convenient one stop shop for patients enhancing clinical collaboration and creating a holistic approach to health and wellness.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understand how the physical environment impacts productivity and patient throughput in outpatient clinics
2. Develop an understanding of the clinical workflow of physicians and medical assistants and its spatial requirements.
3. Identify design elements that reduced clinical walking distances by 36% and the discrepancy between clinical teams’ walking distances by 91%
4. Explore the strategies for reducing real state costs by consolidating & standardizing clinical modules.

4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

B08: Next-Generation Wireless Networks for Healthcare

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Patrick Duffy
Director, Communication Technologies and Infrastructure Services, UI Health Care Information Systems, University of Iowa Health Care
 
Mark Niehus RCDD
Director of Strategic Accounts, Connectivity Wireless Solutions

Healthcare facility planning professionals are entering a new era of increasing user demands, proliferation of wireless technologies including cellular, public safety two-way radio, Wi-Fi, and the much-touted Internet of Things (IoT). In an effort to stay on the cutting edge of healthcare services, facilities are often quick to implement new telehealth, smartphone, and cloud-based technologies, only to face crippling capacity and coverage challenges in the aftermath. Join us as the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics Director of IT, Patrick Duffy, shares his experience on implementing a proactive, thoroughly planned in-building wireless strategy to improve operational efficiency, increase patient, visitor and staff satisfaction, and avoid current and future connectivity challenges. Learn and discuss, from an IT and building-planner perspective, how to plan for the networks of tomorrow in terms of facility space, power, and capital budget and lifecycle costs.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understand how coming wireless technologies (5G, IoT, virtual reality) will impact healthcare operations
2. Identify the technologies that exist to solve current and future in-building connectivity challenges
3. Identify key components of successful in-building wireless planning and strategy
4. Prove a strong in-building wireless network as a means of improving patient care and facility operational efficiency

Wednesday, September 20, 2017
8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

B09: Building on Success: Enhancing Renovations through Continuous Improvement

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Andrew Brumbach, AIA
Associate Architecture, TRO
 
Alison Faecher IIDA, NCIDQ, EDAC
Associate Principal, Director of Interior Design, TRO
 
Robert Raymond, AIA, LEED
Senior Architect Planner, Brigham & Women's Hospital

Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) wanted to reimagine the inpatient care units located inside their 35-year-old tower to reflect the quality of care synonymous with BWH. With 500 of their 800 beds located inside the tower, the potential gains could be significant for both staff & patients. At the project outset, the design team shadowed personnel to gather information on flows, adjacency, communication, ergonomics & noise. Using this current state analysis, a series of countermeasures were incorporated into prototypes; targeting issues identified by the shadowing event. Due to a high tower census, renovations have occurred one unit at a time. As each unit is inhabited, the team reconvenes for a POE involving “lessons learned”. The design of each unit has improved with each iteration, in a cycle of “plan-do-check-act”. This session will address how having a clear vision & desire to continuously learn creates a deliberate & strategic approach to unit planning & outcomes.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Recognize methods for analysis of current state and development of countermeasures as a means for making informed design decisions.
2. Research the most current strategies for reducing Hospital Acquired Infections (HAI) in patient care environments.
3. Assess techniques for supporting the ever-changing technology and how to achieve adaptable solutions.
4. Summarize the framework of a post occupancy review, identifying techniques for creating a continuous improvement cycle of “Plan-Do Check-Act”.

9:45 AM - 10:45 AM

B10: The Art of Storytelling – Supporting the Institution’s Brand Through Design

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Sasha Archer, AIA, LEED AP ID+C, WELL AP
Associate, Architect, HOK
 
Cheryl Hanson, LEED Green Assoc.
Interiors Coordinator, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital
 
Marjorie Sobylak, Assoc. AIA
Sr. Project Manager, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital
 
Christine Vandover, IIDA, NCIDQ, LEED AP
Senior Interior Designer, HOK

The US News Best Hospital Report publishes annual rankings designed to help patients identify treatment facilities that are delivering excellence in medical care. In 2016, the magazine has again ranked New York-Presbyterian Hospital as the #1 hospital in NYC and #6 in the nation. Storytelling is used as a way to align consumers to a company’s service by communicating memorable messages and making that business the preferred choice even in a crowded marketplace. Interior design uses visual and experiential stories. With its unique urban context and challenges, NYP’s new David H. Koch Center in NYC embodies the institution’s vision of enhanced and quality care through thoughtful interior environments composed of functional yet attractive details, materials and furnishings, and elevated graphics and art. This presentation reflects on ways the interior design and creative process was used to support the hospital’s mission in providing a positive and memorable patient experience.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Examine the challenges presented in the new facility's urban context and discuss how the hospital’s vision was integrated into the design theme
2. Discuss the integration of interior design to develop the institution’s story, and explore design opportunities to enhance and propel the brand
3. Learn about the multi-faceted approach and process to integrating the owner’s vision and unique design aesthetic into the various space types
4. Identify technology innovations and design tools, and discuss how they were used to propel design decisions

Room Three
Monday, September 18, 2017
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

C01: Keeping a Medical Campus Operational During Major Infrastructure Upgrades

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Bryan Bagley PE, ASHRAE
Senior Project Engineer, Affiliated Engineers, Inc.
 
John Frye
Project Director, The Walsh Group - Walsh Construction & Archer Western
 
Tarek Thomas ACCE
Program Director, Capital Projects, University of Texas Medical Branch

In 2008, Hurricane Ike caused massive flooding at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) in Galveston, affecting more than a million square feet and significantly damaging major utility systems. The district heating and cooling system remained submerged in salt water for several weeks, sustaining permanent and extensive damage. Rather than replace in kind, UTMB decided to protect utility sources by elevating boilers and chillers or protecting them with floodwalls. This work includes: building conversions from steam to hot water, building tie-ins (without interrupting operations), a new thermal distribution loop, demolition of old systems and replacement with new systems. Over 50 buildings are involved. Come hear how UTMB, with the help of its partners, are simultaneously optimizing capital investment and operational spending with resiliency and efficiency, to thrive as well as survive on this coastal island.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how to maintain clinical, research and educational operations while conducting major infrastructure upgrades.
2. Determine how to balance the short and long term operational needs with the capital realities, when the unexpected happens.
3. Hear about the communication and planning required to keep the high volume of students, teachers, doctors, patients and project workers all safe.
4. Understand the major challenges and lessons learned, when you have to quickly begin implementing critical and invasive infrastructure projects.

11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

C02: Re-Imagining a Community Hospital in a Shared Accountability Organization

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Marla Birch
Nurse Administrator, RN MAOM, Intermountain Healthcare, Alta View Hospital
 
Jeffrey Dreesman
Regional Healthcare Practice Leader, Associate Principal, Perkins+Will
 
Marvina Williams
Senior Healthcare Operational Planner, Senior Associate, Perkins+Will

Intermountain Alta View Hospital located in Sandy, Utah has provided personable, family-oriented care since 1982. The Hospital faced mounting competition and a declining census when it was integrated into the Intermountain Healthcare System. The Hospital engaged Perkins+Will to reimagine the campus, at the time a 71-bed facility with three decades of expansions, by strategically aligning operations and facilities. Utilizing a Lean process, diverse stakeholders were brought together to reimagine the campus as a satellite hospital with greatly expanded outpatient services and redefined inpatient services. The Hospital is now positioned to provide exceptional care for its local populations while adapting to the shared accountability environment by serving as an outpost for a larger regional medical center in the System. This session will describe the Lean, integrated operational and facility planning that resulted in this successful, supported new vision for the Hospital.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
 
1.  Identify and engage diverse stakeholders in operational and facility design
2.  Transform a community hospital within a shared accountability organization as mergers and acquisitions occur
3.  Build consensus around a changing operational and facility vision
4.  Evaluate strategic planning of inpatient and outpatient service lines and supporting facilities
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

C03: Bluestem Community Health - The Birth of a Community Wellness Campus

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Ryan Crouch, D.O.
Internal Medicine, Wagoner Medical Group
 
Cyndi McCullough
Senior Healthcare Consultant, Vice President, HDR Architecture
 
Brian Zabloudil AIA, NCARB, LEED AP BD+C
Associate | Healthcare Planner | Children's Services Leader, HDR

Bluestem Community Health in Grand Island, Nebraska was born out of a group of physicians who wanted to forge a new path and find a new way to give back to their community. In 2014 a group of Physicians decided that they were ready to build a new legacy for their community and create a hospital with a focus on personal care. With the help of HDR they were able to design not only a new 67 bed full service hospital but also a greater wellness campus that will create opportunities that promote health and wellness. The team also worked together to build a new brand for the hospital from the ground up; Bluestem Community Health. Bluestem is a prairie grass of Nebraska and was chosen as the symbol and identity of the brand because of its defining characteristics. Like the bluestem grass for which it is named, the hospital is a symbol of the deep roots of their Nebraska heritage and the values they share with the community: hard work, honesty, respect and compassion.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
 
1.  Learn how physician led micro hospitals are changing the landscape of Midwestern cities
2.  Hear about how a greater wellness campus was designed around Bluestem Community Health
3.  Explore how the creation of a brand is woven into the identity of new community hospital
4.  Learn about how numerous Evidence Based Design strategies were able to be implemented into this green-field design
3:15 PM - 4:15 PM

C04: Unexpected Parallels: What Healthcare Can Learn from the Financial + Retail Industries

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Gina Bleedorn
Chief Experience Officer, Adrenaline
 
Sean Keathley
President, Adrenaline

As experts in transforming and designing comprehensive customer experiences in the financial and retail industries, we will discuss the parallels between these industries and healthcare. The trends in experiential space design within financial and retail are directly predictive of the future of healthcare. We will apply our expertise as design practitioners to give healthcare organizations a blueprint for creating and implementing a brand-centric customer journey within their networks.
 
Consumers are demanding experiential change in nearly every industry today, and healthcare is the next big industry ripe for change. Rather than accepting treatment of a condition, today’s uber-empowered patients are demanding more. Consumers are now calling the shots and healthcare is playing catchup - this is where non-healthcare organizations are well ahead of the curve.
 
As a healthcare provider, taking the time to understand the consumer while identifying a unique value proposition is key to ensuring your evolved healthcare brand is meeting the modern consumer’s needs by providing a customized experience. Find out what healthcare can learn from the financial and retail industries to create innovative customer experiences that inspire more than satisfaction.

 
 
Tuesday, September 19, 2017
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

C05: A Flooring POE: EBD Decisions Support Healthcare Operational Efficiency

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Jeffrey S. Kent
Managing Director of Facilities, Enterprise Services, Nemours Foundation
 
Kristin Ledet
Principal, Senior Project Manager, FKP
Ruthann K. Turner, BSN, RN, MDiv, NE-BC
PICU Nurse Manager, Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children
Mary White CHESP, CHTS
EVS Operations Manager, Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children

When the Nemours design and planning team considered flooring for the new Children's Hospital in Wilmington, DE, selection drivers were focused on safety, operational optimization and clinical efficiency. In the past, Nemours struggled with their scores for cleanliness and patient perception. An extensive mock-up process, validated perception, safety and clean-ability. The impact flooring materials has on operational cost savings and IAQ will be shared in support of making informed decisions. When placed at the forefront for its attributes, the session will share how premium rubber floorcovering contributed to EBD performance improvement goals. In 2016, a Post-Occupancy Evaluation (POE) was completed. The project team will share the Nemours story and astounding results from in-person testimonials from the design, caregiver, facility and EVS perspective. With construction dollars at a premium, the POE and cost analysis will set the stage and standard for flooring decisions.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. The POE: The Built-Environment & Engaging Healthcare Planning is recognized through EBD measures to support transforming outcomes with flooring.
2. There is a paradigm shift from patient-experience to outcomes and efficiency. This session assesses flooring and its actionable impact on outcomes.
3. ISSA Standards: the Cleaning Industry Management Standard benchmarks for maintenance and operational optimization to inform flooring decisions.
4. The C-Suite demands their project partners assess, measure and provide solutions supporting operational optimization given limited capital dollars

12:45 PM - 2:00 PM

C06: Ancient & Modern: Intersecting Traditional Healing & Present-day Healthcare

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Deswood Etsitty
Facilities Planner, Indian Health Service
 
Max Parrill, ACHA, LEED AP BD+C, WELL AP
Associate / Architect, Dekker/Perich/Sabatini
 
Bill Sabatini FAIA, ACHA
Principal, Dekker/Perich/Sabatini
 
Linda White
Former CEO, Indian Health Services Kayenta Service Unit

The Kayenta Health Center embodies Wellness on multiple levels & couples traditional cultural perspectives of healing with current wellness trends. The hospital serves the local Diné community, integrating the community’s significant cultural perspective of “Hozho iina”, translated as “balanced and good life”, and providing a spectrum of outpatient & inpatient care. To support the Indian Health Service’s mission to keep people healthy rather than focusing on disease treatment, the Wellness Center, community health, physical therapy & health education functions are located at the main entrance. This placement contradicts the perceived hierarchy of medicine and inpatient care, and instead, emphasizes cultural traditions and current trends & theories of healthcare that put Wellness first, emphasize preventative care & view staying healthy as the first line of defense. Learn how a cultural understanding of wellness combined with state-of-the-art healthcare is affecting patient outcomes.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn about Indian Health Service’s healthcare initiative.
2. Evaluate how services are accommodated in the building and how they are improving outcomes.
3. Recognize how this facility responds to the culture of the Diné population.
4. Understand ancient healthcare and wellness traditions and how they coincide with the industry's current thinking about wellness.

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

C07: A Psychological Approach: The HAI Impact Leading Safe Patient Experience

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Larry Rubin, CPE, CEM, CHFM, CHSP
Senior Director of Facilities Management, Cleveland Clinic
 
Thom Wellington
Co-Founder, Infection Control University

As healthcare evolves, one of the most overlooked assets is the team of workers who keep the facility operating efficiently and safely. As innovation and disruption descend on hospitals, workers need to understand the importance of working as a team as well as the WHY in a quickly changing environment. With the right mindset, these workers can become valuable ambassadors for a safe patient experience. Being a leader is difficult, but with these psychological-based tips, workers can quickly build a confident educated team that will make a difference in the facility. - Educates on HAI impact for everyone - Looks at the facility’s reputation through social media - Directs the team by utilizing a powerful tool in asking ‘What is the WHY?’ - Leads everyone to understand the mission.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understanding the impact of HAIs on the entire facility
2. Changing the mindset of everyone who performs work in the facility
3. Teaching the value of WHY working as a team is vital in a quickly changing environment
4. Becoming an effective leader by accepting change to survive

4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

C08: The Impact of Visibility on Teamwork, Communication, and Security in ED.

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Arsalan Gharaveis, Ph.D.(C), MARC, FIIA, EDAC
Ph.D Candidate, Texas A&M University
 
Debajyoti Pati, PHD, FIIA, LEED AP
Professor, Texas Tech University

The research question that this research proposed: “What is the nature of the relationship between visibility and teamwork, collaborative communication, and security in emergency departments?” This study adopted a relational research design conducted in four EDs within the same system. The measurement of different layouts by the application of Isovist in Depthmap software provided an objective assessment of the visibility of the EDs’ environments, and the findings were reassessed by conducting a systematic field observation as a qualitative and quantitative assessment tool of the departments’ visibility. Also, Team Effectiveness Audit Tool (TEAT) and Collaborative Practice Scales (CPS) were the measurements of teamwork and communication. The findings support that some aspects of teamwork and communication are improved by enhancement of visibility. Also, the rate of security issues were lower in departments with high visibility value.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understanding the importance of visibility in emergency department design
2. Clarifying the importance of teamwork and communcation in health delivery
3. Exploring the impact of environmental design on teamwork and collaborative communication
4. Identify opportunities to enhance teamwork and communication by design solutions.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017
8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

C09: Avoiding Pitfalls of Clinic Design & Construction

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
David Boome AIA
Division Director for Facility Planning & Construction Management, Norton Healthcare
 
Steve Wiser FAIA
Director of Healthcare Design, JRA Architects

Schedule delays, escalating costs, and increasing frustration: these are several of the pitfalls of the clinic design and construction process. Healthcare projects require hundreds of decisions and if just a few are not properly implemented, then significant problems can occur. Preparing a ‘total project budget’ and establishing a defined ‘scope of work’ are a few of the upfront steps, that if correctly implemented, can save much time, money, and stress.

This discussion will include both new construction as well as renovation projects. It will feature methodologies to mitigate and lessen the difficulties of clinic implementation. Steve Wiser, FAIA, of JRA Architects, and David Boome, AIA, of Norton Healthcare, have each built over a billion dollars and millions of square feet in healthcare construction. They will share their expertise in avoiding the numerous pitfalls in order to achieve a successful clinic project.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Techniques for successful staff and design team collaboration
2. Achieving patient privacy, safety, and comfort
3. How to prepare a total project budget
4. Achieving patient privacy, safety, and comfort

9:45 AM - 10:45 AM

C10: From iFit to ICU: Monitoring trends and their impact to facility design

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Diane Ballard RN
Technology Consultant, Mazzetti+GBA
 
Ted Hood BArch
Principal, Mazzetti+GBA

About 70 percent of smartphone owners use mobile apps to do various types of “monitoring” on a daily basis. In addition to consumer monitoring, clinical monitoring occurs in more arenas than ever before: in homes, in clinics, and patient care units that traditionally have not utilized monitoring. Taken separately, each of these applications of monitoring technology have benefits in terms of patient care and outcomes. But is there an added benefit of their aggregation? How do these new technologies impact facility design and operations? This session addresses trends and drivers; space programming considerations; infrastructure planning and technologies associated with patient monitoring and big data.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Assess the trends and research that support the increased use of monitoring
2. Identify different monitoring technologies used in hospitals and their planning considerations
3. Examine the impact of remote monitoring, telemedicine, and ACO connectivity on hospital infrastructure and design
4. Discuss the implications of big data and its potential effect on facility design

Room Four
Monday, September 18, 2017
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

D01: DISCUSSION FORUM: From Function to Form: How Smart Design Enables Smart Healthcare Operations

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKER
 
Phillip Siek
Senior Director, Planning & Construction, Sanford Health

With 380 beds and 1 million square feet, the new Sanford Medical Center is one of the top-10 largest healthcare construction projects in the nation. During this session, you will learn about smart design solutions focused on putting patients first, and the innovative use of technologies to drive efficiency, safety, and patient experience. You will also hear about the concept of an on-stage and off-stage environment and how it has been applied to every aspect of hospital operations. For example, a building separate from the main medical center serves as the Central Energy Plant for the campus, and is connected to the main building via an underground tunnel. In addition to providing the main building with utilities, the energy center is the primary entry point for supplies needed by the medical center, of which many are transported through a pneumatic tube system. The session will also provide lessons learned from the five year construction project.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
 
1.  Interpret how smart design enables smart healthcare operations.
2.  Evaluate the concept of on-stage and off-stage healthcare environment and how it impacts hospital operations.
3.  Research ways design and technology can improve patient experience.
4.  Assess lessons learned from the five year construction project.
11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

D02: DISCUSSION FORUM: Patient Experience Solutions: A Must-Have for New Construction & Design

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKER
 
Seth Bokser MD, MPH
Assoc. Clinical Professor UCSF School of Medicine, Chief Medical Officer Oneview

Today’s healthcare patients are consumers who have clear expectations of what a hospital should be. Hospitals know they have to start offering innovative design, patient-friendly way-finding, concierge-like services and hotel-stay amenities to drive traffic. The innovators in healthcare are equipping their facilities with cutting-edge patient experience technology that is helping them embrace the growing demand for this type of consumer-centric care, while also empowering clinicians to focus on what they do best – improving the lives of those they care for. And it’s paying off. Not only are these hospitals seeing an increase in patient satisfaction, but also enhanced outcomes and reduced costs. With the global patient engagement market projected to skyrocket from $ 6.6B in 2015 to more than $16.4B in 2020, now is the time for designers, builders and architects to incorporate the patient experience into the proposals they are presenting to hospital leaders.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
 
1.  Understand the patient experience market / potential / value.
2.  Elevate future proposals by incorporating measurable results related to patient experience.
3.  Witness the real-world benefits achieved by UCSF, one of top hospitals in the nation, after implementing a patient experience solution.
4.  Assess the savings you can bring to your clients as a result of incorporating a patient experience solution.
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

D03: DISCUSSION FORUM: "The Facility Will See You Now": Care in an era of artificial intelligence

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKER
 
John S. Milne MD, MBA, FACEP
Founder and CEO, Avnew Health

Artificial Intelligence (AI) stands at the cusp of dramatically transforming healthcare delivery. Big Data and advanced analytics have already revolutionized a multitude of economic sectors. Now forward-leaning healthcare designers and strategists must consider how advanced AI systems will redefine their facility projects. Beyond traditional IT issues such as network adequacy or intelligent building control systems, project teams must consider how smart-buildings will actively diagnose disease or modulate wellness. How the fundamental definition of a “healthcare facility” may change if commercial or residential buildings integrate population-health AI systems. How hospital projects may give way to AI enhanced wellness-focused housing developments. Take a glimpse beyond the state of the art with Dr. John Milne, physician, design consultant, and healthcare strategist, as he explores of the intersection of Artificial Intelligence, health care delivery and cutting-edge facility design.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Explore the potential impact of Big Data Analytics and Artificial Intelligence on care delivery and its integration into healthcare facility design.
2. Recognize the practical challenges and limitations associated with the application of Big Data Analytics.
3. Understand how healthcare facilities may be redefined in an era of Artificial Intelligence and its potential impact on future projects.
4. Explore the economic variables associated with the integration of Artificial Intelligence within facility design.

3:15 PM - 4:15 PM

D04: DISCUSSION FORUM: Let's Get Started: Technology wants versus needs

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKER
 
Grant Ramsay
Regional Director of Technology Design, Vanderweil Engineers
Full description available by end of May.
Tuesday, September 19, 2017
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

D05: Patient CHOICE & Access: Healthcare Urbanism & effects on delivery points

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
TBA
, Dept. of Veterans Affairs
 
Holly Harris, Associate AIA, LEED AP BD+C
Designer, Healthcare Planner, SmithGroupJJR
 
Pablo Torresarpi, Int'l AIA, LEED AP
Sr. Healthcare Planner, Architect III, SmithGroupJJR
 
Vladislav Torskiy, ACHE, AORN, IAIA, Lean Healthcare CP
Health Care Studio Leader | Principal, SmithGroupJJR

The 2016 Commission on Care called for a vision to transform Veterans’ health care to enhance quality, access, choice and well-being with the mission to create a multi-disciplinary environment that inspires to evoke change and the advancement of a better delivery of healthcare through physical space. With the Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014 (VACAA), Congress tasked VHA with creating the temporary Choice Program, designed to alleviate access issues by allowing for greater use of community care for enrolled veterans, [but] the design and implementation of the law have proven to be flawed. This hypothetical study researches one VISN submarket and maps VA and non-VA community based care delivery points that explore non-VA care point, hypothetical referral patterns, time and travel distances, services provided in relationship to VA capabilities, and the concept of Healthcare Urbanism, identifying the specialty care providers that can offer Veterans with a choice.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Evaluate existing geographic market of healthcare network
2. Analyze patient demographics and referral patterns in relation to delivery of care
3. Identify opportunities for alternate points of care to best serve the patient
4. Plan for future growth where points of care are non-accessible

12:45 PM - 2:00 PM

D06: American College of Healthcare Architects Exam Prep Seminar

Open to Conference Attendees Only

ACHA’s professional credential in healthcare architecture is the only specialty certification program recognized by the AIA. This workshop will provide healthcare architects with useful information to submit their credentials and prepare for the ACHA Exam. The seminar covers: application materials, exam topics, sample questions, scoring criteria and exam schedules.

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

D07: The Micro Hospital: Bringing Innovative Care Models to Local Neighborhoods

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
T.J. Grassetti
VP Strategic Partnerships, SCL Health System
 
Dan Harrington
Development Executive, Healthcare, Duke Realty
 
John Marshall
Vice President, National Healthcare Strategy and Development, Duke Realty
 
Victor Schmerbeck
Executive Vice President of Strategy and Business Development, Emerus

SCL, Emerus and Duke Realty developed and opened four micro hospitals near Denver. They’re smaller than conventional hospitals and, thus, easier to navigate; and located in convenient suburban neighborhoods. They also offer the same extensive healthcare services found on larger hospital campuses but are less expensive to build than traditional hospitals. The team faced a number of challenges, including quickly learning each locality’s different regulations, designing the facilities to house the necessary services in a smaller space, and locating the hospitals on sites that are highly convenient for all users. The facilities are meeting the area’s increasing demand for new medical services; and providing residents with comprehensive care including emergency and non-emergency services and both primary and secondary care in one location. The facilities also are enabling the health systems to quickly and cost effectively build their patient base and enhance patient satisfaction.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Review a process for implementing a successful micro hospital development partnership, including differences in micro hospitals v. FSEDs.
2. Summarize the benefits of incorporating outpatient services, including urgent care, into a micro hospital.
3. Review key provider and patient benefits of micro hospitals, including lower costs, speed to market, greater convenience and increased satisfaction.
4. Discuss key lessons learned by two leading healthcare providers and their development teams in developing micro hospitals.

4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

D08: Families meet Facilities. Ways for Design to Directly Impact Experience

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Leanne Cimato RN, BSN
Family Services Manager, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
 
Natalie Miovski Hagerty, AIA, EDAC, LEED AP
Director, Facilities Planning, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

With a focus on improving the patient/family experience, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia created a dedicated Facilities/Family Services workgroup which is unique to most children’s hospitals. This workgroup is dedicated to working across departments including clinical teams, process improvement, security, hospital operations and language services to ensure that the patient/family experience is optimal from appointment scheduling, through the duration of a visit and supporting the return home.

The workgroup has launched several work streams in close partnership with families and staff, including a new wayfinding/theming initiative, developing a new family hospitality center, Sabbath elevator program, reimagining of all public spaces, developing on-stage/ off stage staff spaces and family communication and staff communication plans. This workgroup has been able to improve the patient/family experience through design improvements, without new physical space.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Identify ways that a facilities + hospitality partnership can improve patient experience.
2. Learn tips to improve an existing facility and experience without building new or breaking the bank.
3. Prioritize the greatest family impact with short, mid and long term initiatives, leveraging patient and family voices
4. Utilize enterprise resources to evaluate the effects of the design interventions

Wednesday, September 20, 2017
8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

D09: From Construction to Operations — The Methodist Olive Branch Hospital Story

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Mike Burton
Senior Mechanical Engineer, Smith Seckman Reid Inc.
 
Michael Nolan
Facility Services Director, Methodist Olive Branch Hospital
 
Clay Seckman
Executive Vice President, Smith Seckman Reid Inc.

In 2010, Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare finally received a long awaited CON for an expansion greenfield hospital in Olive Branch, MS, the first new hospital to be built in the state in over 20 years. The business case for the new facility included construction and operating expenses well below industry averages. The owner selected an integrated design and construction team, which utilized the full component of lean processes to deliver the new facility well below budget and ahead of schedule.

The project was the first LEED Gold for Healthcare recipient in the country. The innovative HVAC system selection process yielded a geothermal water source heat pump system, to reduce energy consumption and optimize construction and maintenance costs. Completed in 2013, the new facility now has several years of operations under its belt, with energy performance and overall effectiveness meeting expectations.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understand a new approach to system selection processes, where all impacts of alternative systems are considered and measured
2. Understand the importance of establishing performance parameters before system selection discussions begin
3. Exposure to a relatively new HVAC system concept in the acute healthcare environment
4. Understanding the importance of robust operation/maintenance staff training and orientation prior to facility operation

9:45 AM - 10:45 AM

D10: Lessons Learned in Outpatient Clinic Design and Construction

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Jerry Akin AIA, NCARB, LEED AP
Vice President & West Region Area Manager, Broaddus & Associates
 
Kurt Neubek, FAIA, CFM, EDAC, CSSBB
Principal / Architect, Page
 
Maria M. Zampini
Chief Operating Officer, University Medical Center of El Paso

University Medical Center in El Paso recently opened two new 46,000 square foot outpatient clinics, based on one prototype. This session, presented by the Owner, Architect, and Program Manager, will cover a myriad of lessons learned through the programming, design and construction of these beautiful new clinics.

Topics will include: 

The Owner's goals and operational model for the clinics 
The Architect's recap of the design process used and key decisions made 
The Program Manager will provide insights into the benefits of having one contractor build two facilities simultaneously 
All the presenters will share the aspects that contributed to the success of the projects and what they might do differently today Gain some insights into state-of-the-art outpatient clinic design and operations that may help you on your next project!

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn about the Owner's goals and strategies that led to the prototype clinic concept
2. Understand the decisions that led to the programming, design and construction of the facilities
3. Gain insight into the pros and cons of building two nearly identical facilities simultaneously
4. Obtain information about the lessons learned from these model facilities

Room Five
Monday, September 18, 2017
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

E01: Crystal Ball Not Required: Anticipating Trends and Maximizing Facility ROI

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Sheila F. Cahnman, FAIA, FACHA, LEED AP
President, JumpGarden Consulting, LLC
 
Philip DeBruzzi FACHE
Director, Navigant
 
Richard Haas
Senior Vice President, Ancillary Services, Kettering Health Network

In this age of declining resources and evolving care delivery models, healthcare providers are grappling with how to make the best long-term facility investments to advance their strategic goals and manage risk. This session will review the major healthcare trends, such as payment models, demographic shifts, technological advances, personalized health and others, that affect facility planning and feature how careful master planning can allow incremental change and growth through renovation and expansion without limiting future options in uncertain times. A case study will highlight how one major healthcare system has incorporated these values into their planning, highlighting both the successes and failures of planning on their campuses. The session will include a checklist of issues to be considered when evaluating a prospective project including the principles of adaptability, convertibility and expandability.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
 
1.  Identify key healthcare trends that will affect facility planning in the next decade.
2.  Understand how adaptability, convertibility and expandability can provide facility future-proofing.
3.  Evaluate design strategies that can readily incorporate change.
4.  Review a client’s master planning case study highlighting successes and failures.
11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

E02: ZIP Code Health: How Research and Design Can Impact Community Health

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Michael Crawford
Chief of Staff, Unity Health Care, Inc.
 
Tama Duffy Day FIIDA, FASID
Principal and Firmwide Health & Wellness Practice Area Leader, Gensler
 
Louise Russell
Principal, Interior Elixir and Consultant, Glen Raven
 
Bonny Slater, ASID, NCIDQ, LEED AP
Senior Interior Designer, Gensler

Research has shown that ZIP code can be the single most influential health predictor – more than cholesterol level, blood pressure or age. In underserved communities, health care resources can be limited, resulting in challenges with accessing health information, deceased quality of life, and lower life expectancy. Unity Health Care is the largest network of community health centers in our nation’s capital, and provides comprehensive health and human services to underserved communities throughout Washington, DC.
 
Learn how Unity, Gensler, and Sunbrella® Contract fabrics, sought to understand the importance of the waiting room as a social component of community health. Waiting room experiences establish the tone for each patient’s visit, including feelings about the provider, attitude toward treatment, and perceptions of personal health.
 
This presentation will share the process of intentional design and community engagement regarding how the waiting room could positively impact the patient experience and satisfaction. See how community informed artwork and upholstery textiles colors and patterns change how patients perceive their overall experience at Unity’s Brentwood health center.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
 
1.  See how a research intervention at the Unity Health Care, Brentwood clinic, had a positive impact on patient satisfaction scores.
2.  Learn about the positive impact Unity Health Care has had in providing health to underserved populations throughout the Washington, DC area.
3.  Learn how through community engagement and intention, unique textile and art designs were created and had a positive impact on patient experiences.
4.  Get a first hand view of healthcare and politics in our nations' capital.
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

E03: A Green Roof; Asset or Nightmare

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Robert P. Goss Jr., AIA
Senior Associate, Ballinger
 
David J. Major, P.E., CHC, CHFM
Director, Facilities & Construction, Reading Health System
 
Charles D. Miller, PE
President, Roofmeadow
 
Thomas J. Parr Jr., AIA
Associate Principal, Ballinger

Reading Health System recently completed a 465,000 SF building with 88,000 SF of Green Roof that is accessible to patients, visitors, and staff. Conceptually, the location above clinical space spawned a design strategy that incorporates the Roof Garden into a larger exterior space, visually minimizes the massive 115,000 SF Operating Platform footprint, and connects to the Reading Museum adjacent to the site. Technical challenges, costs, and maintenance became the team’s primary focus once the design goals were established. As the complexity of the Healing Garden grew, so did the structure to support it. Investigation of design and material changes ultimately enabled the clinical space below to have an inhabitable ceiling height. Concerns from clinicians, facility personnel, and insurance underwriters required detailing that had redundant functions, but ultimately, the use of new technologies and materials created a solid building envelop that satisfied all concerns.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Illustrate the experiential impacts of a green roof
2. Establish green roof design process and possibilities
3. Explain green roof technical implications to building envelope design
4. Identify common requirements of green roof design and documentation

3:15 PM - 4:15 PM

E04: Volunteers transforming a public hospital into a healing environment.

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKER
 
Bruce Komiske MHA, FACHE
V. P. New Hospital Design and Construction, Erlanger Medical Center
SPEAKERS
 
Martica Lambiase
Co-Chair, Arts at Erlanger, Erlanger Medical Center
 
Judith Spiegel
Co-Chair, Arts at Erlanger, Erlanger Medical Center

The Country's 7th largest public hospital had been capital starved for many years. With new leadership the hospital's financial situation turned around in three short years by investing in people and programs. In addition to new medical technology and facilities, the institution realized that its' approach to creating a healing environment was equally in need of a transformation but there was no staff or budget to fuel the transformation. Two volunteers stepped up to the challenge. Starting with a small committee, they developed two healing gardens, an award winning chapel, created by hosting a design competition between teams of local architects and artists, an art exhibition space, daily performances and most recently a collection of over 350 pieces of original photography. All with practically no official budget. This process has also transformed the new Children's Hospital, with the donation of an 1891 Steam Engine and much more, all from the community.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how to transform an "institution" into healing environment without a staff or budget
2. Learn the importance of engaging the local arts community and recognizing the value of their profession
3. Learn how this same approach is transforming the new Children's Hospital into a celebration of the region's culture
4. Learn how these same principles can be applied in any hospital environment

Tuesday, September 19, 2017
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

E05: The Central Nurse Station Redefined; Eliminate WOW clutter: A Case Study

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Paige Macfarlan, NCIDQ, LEED ID+C
Healthcare Planner, Francis Cauffman
 
Kimberly B. Sargent, BSN, RN, NE-BC
Hospital Applications IT Project Manager, St Luke’s University Health Network
 
Beverly Spencer CID, LEED AP, EDAC
Senior Interior Designer, Francis Cauffman

The physical layout of the typical inpatient unit nurse station has changed very little in the last four decades and rarely accommodates technology of today. Adoption of the electronic medical record has solidified the popularity of the workstation on wheels as a documentation tool. The challenge is how to mitigate WOW clutter, preserve record privacy, and manage acoustic disruption for accurate reporting. The team leading the renovation of a patient unit for a community hospital in Coaldale, Pennsylvania wanted to approach the nurse station in a new way, one that would break from the central station of the past. The resulting design is one that has been rarely seen in the hospital setting, and certainly not one which you would expect to find in a traditional coal town. In this session the presenters will speak to the unique opportunities of this design challenge and to the value of the solution a year post occupancy.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how the integration of mobile technology can transform the traditional nursing station
2. Observe the compelling impact of a modified nursing station design on the patient/family experience
3. Learn how use of mobile technology (WOW’s) can positively impact the quality of clinical care by restructuring traditional nursing work patterns.
4. Explore the relationship

12:45 PM - 2:00 PM

E06: Healthcare Prefabrication – Top Down Commitment Maximizes Outcome

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
David C. Brown
Director - Healthcare Care Real Estate, Navigant
 
David R. Cozier PE
Vice President, Facilities & Construction, Mount Carmel Health System
 
Bernie Sublette
Project Executive - Healthcare, AECOM Hunt
 
Steve Verner
Project Manager, Gresham, Smith and Partners

Understanding the value of a collaborative approach to healthcare construction through prefabrication and other facilitating processes that begins with Ownership and extends all the way through subcontractors and suppliers. Engaging all stakeholders early in the project to achieve the best possible outcome for all participants. Learn from the perspective of an Owner, A/E, Construction Manager and subcontractor how a team can function at a high level working together from the conceptual stage of design right up to the time of seeing the first patient. Utilize the lessons learned from this team of experienced healthcare constructors. Be made aware of the role that the Facilities team must play in prefabrication and MEP design coordination to enhance functionality. Recognize that prefabricated systems provide a superior end product as they are assembled in a safer and more controlled environment than if it were built at the jobsite resulting in consistent quality and less waste.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Evaluation and commitment of the prefabrication process by team members.
2. Various perspectives of the healthcare stakeholders related to prefabrication in healthcare.
3. Assessment of the lessons learned from this team of experienced healthcare constructors.
4. Reinforcement of early team member involvement, IPD-like and Lean behavior.

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

E07: Caring for Our Kupuna: A Tale of Hawaii’s Senior Care Transformation

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Jerry Correa
President and CEO, St. Francis Healthcare System
 
Muhsin Lihony
Principal, Lionakis
 
Dean Takasato
Associate Principal, Lionakis

As Hawaii’s population matures, family members are often thrust into caring for their aging loved ones. Most families are simply not prepared to provide the necessary level of care at home. In support of both patients and their caregivers, St. Francis Healthcare System is transforming their 90-year old campus to a state of the art destination for Hawaii’s aging population, and a valuable resource for the extended care team of family members.

This lively presentation illustrates the rejuvenation of St. Francis. A truly unique assemblage of comprehensive senior services is available, due to the facility’s backbone as an acute-care hospital. At the St. Francis’ Liliha campus on Oahu, a Kupuna Village is taking hold, replete with the Aloha spirit. New business partnerships are developed, creating diverse opportunities for care services. A new chapter of senior care is emerging at St Francis, with the margin, to fulfill their mission, of creating healthy communities.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how creating collaborative business partnerships can help a system’s bottom line in providing care, and create a pathway for positive change.
2. Discover how a combination of care modalities, combined with bringing family into the care team can produce vastly enhanced outcomes for seniors.
3. Understand how adapting to changing demographics can bring about opportunities for reinvigorating an institution, and their brand.
4. Learn how the Aloha spirit is infused into the evolution of senior wellness services, from sick care to healthy lifestyle environments.

4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

E08: Building for the future: the transformation of Elmhurst Memorial Hospital

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Dave Connolly
Senior Vice President, Hammes Company
 
Pamela Dunley, RN MS MBA CENP
President/CEO, Elmhurst Memorial Hospital
 
Laura Eslick
Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Elmhurst Memorial
 
Robert F. Sharrow, AIA, ACHA, EDAC, LEED AP
Senior Vice President, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc.

Hammes Co., AKA, and EMH outline the health center's transformation to a transitional state-of-the-art care platform designed to meet its community, care team and patients’ expectations now and into the future. The hospital’s journey exemplifies the power of evolution as it relates to a successful merger, positive progression in leadership and operations improvement. As a mission-centric organization- commitment to outstanding patient outcomes and a ‘Healthy Driven’ operational philosophy drive the organization. The hospital’s journey began with a dynamic strategy resulting in a functional program that enhances the redevelopment of inpatient care services leading to a consistent care continuum that supports the community. EMH is one of seven hospitals in the world to achieve the prestigious Planetree distinction. The presentation will include both practical steps and strategic best practices for systems-based planning in the evolution of expanding partnerships.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
1.  Learn to develop a flexible strategic facilities plan that allows providers to respond effectively to changes in the marketplace
2.  Recognize how strategic facilities planning can give a community-based provider a competitive advantage in a large system market
3.  Identify the value in incorporating patient satisfaction and mission-oriented metrics in the development of operational work flows
4.  Discover how to use integrated project delivery methodologies to support the cultural transformation as the basis for care model evolution

 

Wednesday, September 20, 2017
8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

E09: Healing design for teens in crisis: A story of innovation, research & hope

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Angela Naylor -RN, BSN, MHP
Chief Nurse Executive Behavioral Health, MultiCare Health System
 
Jessica Radecki
Medical Planner, Associate Principal, Clark Kjos Architects

Adolescence can be a tumultuous time in one’s life. Mental health conditions often surface during this time and, for some, this may be their first experience in an inpatient behavioral health unit. How can we, as the design community, best support this complex patient population that is transitioning from childhood to adulthood? Find out how the project team utilized research, LEAN and innovation to solve the challenges of this unique patient population for the 27-bed Adolescent Behavioral Health Unit in Tacoma, Washington in a facility to welcome teen patients with dignity and respect employing a therapeutic and engaging design strategy. Learn about what it means to support a “seclusion and restraint-free” model of care, the nuances of this special patient population in a project that went beyond the current trends in behavioral health design to innovate and create an environment that is fresh, therapeutic, safe and rooted in research.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn about current trends in behavioral health care models that impact the design and the built environment
2. Learn how research influenced and contributed to shaping the environment, attitudes of the entire clinical, design and construction teams
3. Learn about highly specialized spaces and innovations in behavioral health design that contribute to improved safety for patients and staff
4. Learn how LEAN tools were utilized to gain consensus quickly, innovate, meet an aggressive project schedule and achieve goals

9:45 AM - 10:45 AM

E10: Planning Holistic Cancer Centers that Embrace Mind, Body, Spirit

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Kara Freihoefer
Evidence Based Design Research Specialist, HGA Architects and Engineers
 
Keith Novenski
Patient Advocate, ThedaCare
 
Tim Scanley AIA, NCARB
Project Designer, HGA Architects and Engineers
 
Kurt Spiering FAIA, ACHA
Vice President/Healthcare Principal, HGA Architects and Engineers

Inspired by the collaborative Medical Home Model and supported by Evidence-Based Design, healthcare organizations are taking a “mind, body, spirit” approach to planning cancer centers that address clinical and emotional health. This program examines how ThedaCare planned its Regional Cancer Center in Appleton, WI, around three guiding principles: holistic medicine to celebrate human life; patient experiences that engage community members into the planning process; and Lean planning and Evidence-Based Design that links design with metrics. The cancer center includes a multidisciplinary platform of diagnostic, treatment and infusion services, as well as behavioral health, nutrition, physical therapy, acupuncture, yoga, and music therapy. To achieve goals, ThedaCare’s enlisted a Patient Advocate to keep the patients’ perspectives front-and-center. Through this data-supported presentation, attendees will envision a holistic approach to cancer care that celebrates life and hope.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how to expand the vision of cancer centers to address holistic care through “mind, body, spirit.”
2. Learn how to engage a Patient Advocates in the planning process to identify Keystone Experiences that resonate with patients, family, and community.
3. Learn how to combine Lean strategies with Evidenced-Based Design to achieve efficient workflows that support holistic, patient-centered care.
4. Develop tools to track the success of your cancer center--from the patients’ perspective and operations perspective.

Room Six
Monday, September 18, 2017
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

F01: Innovation and Collaboration to Drive and Sustain Transformative Change

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Roxanne Butler, MSOD, RNC
Clinical Manager, Blue Cottage Consulting, Inc.
 
Chad Miller
Director of Operations & Outpatient Service Excellence, Texas Health Huguley Hospital

Lean budgets, limited resources and the need to improve performance are constant challenges in healthcare. Outdated designs and care models, and pressure to improve quality, drive strategic decisions to build or expand. Innovation is required to optimize operations, improve care, and drive service excellence. This session focuses on a hospital transition using innovative “future-thinking” workshops to enhance collaboration and improve operational models. Tool kit examples will be shared including “speed dating,” workflow sessions, and “showcase” events to build teams, engage stakeholders and overcome resistance. The participant will hear lessons learned about the critical timing of training and how a collaborative environment brought teams together starting day one to integrate disparate service lines, streamline experience, and expand strategies to address ongoing improvements. Strategies for developing innovative work sessions of your own will conclude the discussion.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
 
1.  Identify innovative activities and tools that help build teams.
2.  Describe collaborative strategies to engage and build consensus for improving operational models.
3.  Illustrate the tools and techniques used to build a collaborative environment and address ongoing operational improvement needs.
4.  Explain the importance of re-imagined process flows in collaboration with facility design.
11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

F02: You have a Master Plan, but do you have a Master Model?

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Mike Alder
Virtual Construction Manager, CM-BIM, Pepper Construction
 
Justin Hutton
Principal & Project Architect, AIA, LEED, AP, NCARB, Hutton & Hutton, Architects and Engineers
 
David Lenart
Director of Facilities and Materials Management, PE, MBA, Columbus Regional Hospital

Columbus Regional Hospital’s (CRH) desire to evolve patient care has kept them agile & innovative and received many awards. With an upcoming expansion of the ED & cancer center and a new loading dock & utility tunnel, CRH started to think about what happens after the project team leaves. CRH had a master plan, but wanted a master model to use as the source/standards for their operations. CRH engaged BIM consultant Hutton & Hutton and Pepper Construction in the process. CRH wanted to know how the design/construction teams develop the model and the project team to understand how they use the data for their operations – so they could develop a process to deliver the model/data in a way CRH can use going forward. The resulting solution allowed CRH to pick its software platform at a later date and still establish specific standards that would work on future projects. Our presentation shares our process, the plan used to develop the master model & lessons learned/best practices.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
 
1.  Advantages of BIM for the owner – why CRH chose to move to a BIM delivery and the implications of using the model for operations.
2.  How to develop a FM tool – the process, data requirements & team roles - and create standards for delivering the model before selecting software.
3.  Best practices for a model-driven project approach – how BIM drove collaboration, lean practices and technology for problem-solving.
4.  How to analyze whether or not your organization is suited and/or ready to use a Master Model and how to get the process started.
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

F03: Improving the Outpatient Experience - Stanford Cancer Center South Bay

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Katy Ford, AIA
Associate Principal, Ratcliff
 
Chris Morris DBIA, GC
Operations Manager, Healthcare, Swinerton Builders
 
John Sealander, AIA, ACHA, NCARB
Healthcare Architect, Senior Project Manager, Ratcliff
 
George R. Tingwald, M.D., AIA, ACHA
Director of Medical Planning, Planning, Design and Construction, Stanford Health Care

Stanford Cancer Center South Bay, San Jose, CA is Stanford Health Care’s first cancer care outpatient facility located away from Stanford University Medical Center. Learn about this vanguard project from Stanford Health Care and the Design and Construction Team’s perspective. Designed to inspire positivity in patients by building a respectful and dignified patient experience, the Cancer Center offers a holistic approach to treatment benefitting from extensive process design work partnering with Stanford’s Patient and Family Advisory Councils. In addition to state-of-the-art imaging, radiation therapy, infusion treatment and exam clinic the Cancer Center provides surgical oncology, all in one location. A Real Time Location System (RTLS) is used to help track patients. The Cancer Center repurposes a shell and core medical office building offering challenges accommodating vaults and equipment. The project was delivered over a 2 ½ year period from design until occupancy.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn about Stanford’s first comprehensive cancer center and how to meet the requirements of an academic medical center in an outpatient setting.
2. Observe planning concepts that integrate surgical oncology into an ambulatory cancer center including code requirements and patient flow.
3. Integrate interior planning via on-stage and off-stage work flow concepts, clear circulation and wayfinding within a calming patient environment.
4. Implement the construction of technically complex spaces and major imaging equipment in the build-out of a shell and core medical office building.

3:15 PM - 4:15 PM

F04: From Tranquil to Vital: supporting full spectrum Life in Residential Care

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Eleonore Leclerc
Architect, Stantec Architecture
 
Ray Pradinuk, MAIBC, LEED AP
Principal, Leader Healthcare Research & Innovation, Stantec Architecture

Faced with aged and outmoded facilities serving 629 residents on five sites in Vancouver, Providence Healthcare (PHC) launched an innovation and improvement initiative called Residential Care for Me. The first phase of implementation, with Stantec providing integrated design services, will be a new 320-resident dementia care facility on an urban site, developed with deep engagement of residents, families and a 40-person steering committee. A field study was scheduled just prior to completion of the needs assessment and design concept. Eleonore and Ray were part of a 4-person Providence Health Care/Stantec team that visited 17 residential care homes in five European countries. They will summarize the learnings from the field study and the essential characteristics of the social, spatial and activity model adopted for a resident-supportive and socially generative dementia care home based on small households. The presentation will conclude with a virtual tour of the proposed design.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understand the fundamental characteristics of a small-household model home and those of a 'hotel' model facility
2. Identify when to admit that a 'hotel' model facility is the better choice
3. Understand 'freedom of movement' as a fundamental human right that must be upheld in a dementia facility
4. Explore the design of an innovative 320-resident home that embeds all of the essential characteristics of the small household model

Tuesday, September 19, 2017
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

F05: Intermountain Healthcare: Planting Seeds for Change Using Lean Principles

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Barbara Anderson RN, MN
Principal, ZGF Architects LLP
 
Tim Hatch, MHA
Director of Strategic Planning, Intermountain Health
 
Janet Pangman Assoc AIA
Principal, ZGF Architects LLP

Quality healthcare is not explicitly synonymous with efficiency, but Intermountain Healthcare (IH) is determined to deliver both. As the largest healthcare provider in Utah, IH had been applying the notion of Lean principles for years, but chose the expansion of its Park City Medical Center to raise its own bar. By taking a hard look at everything from model of care, clinical flows, materials flows, and patient intake to decisions around provider offices, the project team discovered that IH’s desire for using Lean principles had only scratched the surface of what they could accomplish. That was in early 2014, when the proverbial seed was planted, and before the year was out, a new facility in Murray was also in the works. Now, both facilities have opened, and Lean principles integrated into clinical work flows, have led to more efficient operations for the staff than they had imagined possible. Presenters will provide insight into the process, planning, and tools used to effect change.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Discover how a single ambulatory clinic build can be the catalyst for cultural change for an entire healthcare system.
2. Identify how baseline planning and operational improvements can cultivate exponential change.
3. Learn about “the magic moment” for cultural change, when ownership of Lean principals transfers from the design and leadership team to staff.
4. Explore methods and tools for executing successful client engagement workshops.

12:45 PM - 2:00 PM

F06: Building an Integrated Healthcare Community in Egypt

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Safwan Aly, Ph.D., PMP, LSS-BB
Board of Directors, Egypt Cancer Network 57357
 
Ray Brower, AIA, NCARB, CLGB
Vice President, Health Sciences, CallisonRTKL, Inc.
 
Mitchell L. Collin, AIA, LEED BD+C
Associate Vice President, Health Sciences, CallisonRTKL, Inc.
 
Jim Curran, AIA, LEED AP, CLGB
Vice President, CallisonRTKL, Inc.
 
Mark W. Kieran, MD, PhD
Director of Pediatric Medical Neuro-Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Children's Hospital Boston

Inspired by the model of the St. Jude Research Hospital, Children’s Cancer Hospital Egypt is the largest pediatric oncology hospital in the world.  Established in 2007 with the mission of providing the best comprehensive family centered quality care and to cure all children with cancer seeking its services, free of charge and without discrimination, CCHE 57357 is expanding their current specialty hospital into a multi-facility campus featuring comprehensive pediatric cancer care services and integrated clinical education, training, and research.  This presentation will detail CCHE 57357’s story, demonstrate how international trends in clinical care and medical education are influencing the proposed campus and facilities development, show how the master plan and the design of the campus buildings overlay aspects of the local culture and are working to develop and revitalize the local neighborhood, and discuss some of the architectural and development challenges of working in a dense and historic urban environment.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:


1.  Hear CCHE 57357’s organizational story, their approach to care, and learn how comprehensive pediatric cancer services have been planned for the campus through year;
2.  Learn how international design trends in cancer care and medical education are shaping the campus expansion program and facilities;
3.  Learn how CCHE is engaging academic leaders and institutions around the world to shape the development of their medical education program through training and partnerships;
4.  Understand challenges of implementing large-scale campus development in an historic and dense urban fabric, and what to consider when planning similar expansion projects.

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

F07: Making a LEED Platinum Hospital: Design to Operations

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Tom Chessum FAIA
Principal, CO Architects
 
Russell Fortmeyer, LEED AP BD+C
Associate Principal, Arup
 
William Scrantom PE
Principal, Arup
 
Joseph Stasney
National Director for Hospital Design And Construction, Kaiser Permanente
The full description will be available in early June. Please check back then.
4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

F08: Ditching the Rhetoric: How Public Private Partnerships Deliver Success

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Chris Arthur
Senior Vice President, Balfour Beatty Investments
 
Matt Dekkers
Vice President, Operations, Buildings Midwest, Graham Construction
 
Bruce Raber
Vice President, Practice Leader for Healthcare, Stantec Architecture
 
Tom Sparrow PMP MBA MSc
Chief Project Officer, North Island Hospitals Project, Island Health
P3's often attract undeserved criticism, generally because they are not well understood or not well implemented, or both. There is no doubt that these are complex procurement routes, especially in the healthcare sector. The presenters will show how the P3 approach to procurement and delivery can deliver exceptional results in the context of the recently operational North Island Hospitals Project in BC, Canada. The project procured in 2013 by Vancouver Island Heath Authority, covers a large geographic area, extending from the northern tip of Vancouver Island to south of mid-Island. Existing acute care hospitals serving this area are 50 years old with deteriorating infrastructure, necessitating two new near-identical facilities at Campbell River and Comox, with a combined area of 60,000 m2 and 248 inpatient beds. The project is an exemplary example of collaborative fast track design and an integrated approach to whole life costs, services delivery and optimal risk allocation.
 
LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
 
1. Learn about P3s as a project delivery model, and how they can deliver exceptional fast track design, whole life costing and operational results.
2. The key to collaboration between the owner/healthcare provider and design team in a P3 environment.
3. Discuss how optimal risk allocation is achieved between the owner/healthcare providers, architects, design-builders and private finance providers
4. Hear first-hand some of the pros and cons associated with Public Private Partnerships.
Room Seven
Monday, September 18, 2017
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

G01: Workflow Redesign for a New Facility: A Strategic Approach

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Retty Casey, RN, BSN, MPA:HA
Vice President for Nursing Transformation and Innovation, NYU Langone Medical Center
 
Erin Clark RN, MS, EDAC
Project Manager, HTS, Inc.
 
Kelly Guzman RN MN
Chief Operating Officer/VP Transition Planning, HTS Inc

The time from Design Development to the Activation of a new facility can be a span of many years. During this time the original basis of design and the final product have modifications that impact operations due to changes in state code, value engineering, etc. After working with 31 facilities across the country, a strategic approach based on best practices, common themes, and lessons learned has been developed and can contribute to improved use of the healing environments as they were intended in the design. Aspects of modern facility design requires a detailed analysis of operations to ensure efficient functionality in the new space. Representatives from impacted departments attend large, clinician-led workflow events to create an efficient, patient-centered plan for future state operations. NYU Langone Medical Center used this approach when planning operations for their new 18-story addition and will describe their journey and lessons learned in operations workflow redesign.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:


1.  Describe strategic methods used to approach workflow planning for a new facility
2.  Describe the impact of hospital design attributes on future state operations planning
3.  Understand the benefits of workflow redesign when planning the opening of a new healthcare facility
4.  Describe lessons learned and best practices from workflow redesign from NYU Langone Medical Center

11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

G02: Health(care) Design 2048 – Celebrating 30 years of innovation / Preparing for the next 30 years of transformation

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Heather Fennimore
President, Global Healthcare, Humanscale
 
Bruce Raber
Vice President, Practice Leader for Healthcare, Stantec Architecture
 
Annette Ridenour
President & CEO, Aesthetics Inc
MODERATOR
 
Wayne Ruga, PhD, FAIA, FIIDA, Hon. FASID
Founder and President, The CARITAS Project

Laying the foundations for a more balanced, diverse, inclusive, and collaborative health(care) design community, this forward looking, emergent, evolving, and highly interactive and participatory program will explore compelling visions for a new and more desired future; challenge and invite each participant to become an active collaborator in the realization of the new future; propose an initial design for the structure of ongoing, year-round collaborative engagement; and map the preliminary, agreed ‘next steps’, with commitments to specific activities, that will unfold the transition towards the new future. In this program, we will draw from the teachings of Janus – requiring that we begin our new journey by, first, looking back to capture our ‘learnings and wisdom’, serving as our touchstones as we progress into the present.

This program is the first part of the progressive journey of Generative Space Track programs, culminating in a free, all-community event on Wednesday afternoon, 20 September, where the clarity, design, structure, and tangibles of our new future vision will continuously unfold throughout these programs. Attendees are invited to participate in any or all of these programs.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how do new visions become future shaping
2. Understand how to influence the mainstream
3. Explore how can we design more caring environments
4. Learn how can we measure our progress.

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

G03: The Generative Space Primer: Learning From The 2017 Generative Space Award Recipients

Open to Conference Attendees Only

MODERATOR
 
Wayne Ruga, PhD, FAIA, FIIDA, Hon. FASID
Founder and President, The CARITAS Project

Meet the recipients of the 2017 ‘Generative Space Award’ (to be announced). See their submittals; learn from their presentations; engage with these leading pioneers in a discussion about how both systemic and sustainable improvements to health, healthcare, and wellbeing can be made through the design of the environment; and then plan your own strategy for submitting your pioneering projects to the 2018 ‘Generative Space Award’ in June 2018. This program will draw, further, from the present view of Janus – as we celebrate the designation of new exemplars of more caring environments and attempt to gain new ‘awareness and insight’ to illuminate our journey towards a new, more desired future.

This program is the second part of the progressive journey of Generative Space Track programs, culminating in a free, all-community event on Wednesday afternoon, 20 September, where the clarity, design, structure, and tangibles of our new future vision will continuously unfold throughout these programs. Attendees are invited to participate in any or all of these programs.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how ‘action research’ can be applied to healthcare design projects
2. Understand how to make systemic and sustainable improvements with generative space
3. Explore how generative space can improve lives, organizations, and communities
4. Understand how to make an award-winning submittal to the ‘Generative Space Award’
5. Learn how to design more caring environments with Generative Space

3:15 PM - 4:15 PM

G04: Women’s College Hospital, Toronto –‘ 2016 Generative Space Award’ Recipient

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Susan Black
Principal and Director, Perkins Eastman Black Architects Inc
 
Heather J. McPherson, MSc, BSc, OT, CHE
Executive Vice-President of Patient Care and Ambulatory Innovation, Women’s College Hospital

In this presentation - fifteen months after receiving the ‘2016 Generative Space Award’ - the lead award recipients will reflect on the key learning design features of this progressive facility; discuss the design highlights that enable sustainable performance improvements; describe new organizational initiatives and their associated proposed design strategies; and explore new understandings of how Generative Space can be used to improve health. Again, drawing from the view of Janus, this presentation opens up the future focused space for the exploration of ‘new possibilities’ – in a real time laboratory that will inform our emerging future visions.

This program is the third part of the progressive journey of Generative Space Track programs, culminating in a free, all-community event on Wednesday afternoon, 20 September, where the clarity, design, structure, and tangibles of our new future vision will continuously unfold throughout these programs. Attendees are invited to participate in any or all of these programs.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn what Generative Space is, and how we know that it is present
2. Understand how designing with Generative Space can produce sustained performance improvements
3. Discover how to measure Generative Space improvements
4. Explore how Generative Space can be used to improve health

Tuesday, September 19, 2017
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

G05: Building Momentum: How Architecture supports Progress In A Rehab Facility

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Greg Braithwaite, AIA, ACHA
VP of Healthcare Design/Practice Leader, HuntonBrady Architects
 
Jill Haladay, DPT, MPH, GCS
Chief Rehabilitation Officer, Bannasch Institute for Advanced Rehabilitation Medicine,Lakeland Regional Health
 
Michael Parker
Senior Project Coordinator, HuntonBrady Architects

The Bannasch Institute for Advanced Rehabilitation Medicine is a technologically-advanced healthcare environment that reinforces the Institute’s Design Drivers of progress and momentum throughout the facility. Architects and interior designers worked closely with physicians and physical and occupational therapists to create a modern space that incorporates research results about the importance of motivation and progress in recovery program effectiveness. New and innovative technology was developed, tested, and implemented for the first time into the project, enhancing the tools used in the rehab process. Access to nature using various architectural features and the creation of a therapeutic landscaped outdoor rehab space responds to evidence-based design.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understand and review the latest research about how motivation and goal-setting affect patient outcomes and performance in a rehab facility.
2. Identify key ways clinicians incorporate measures of patient progress in a rehab facility through architecture, interior design & new technology
3. Learn how to design an environment that encourages goal-setting, allows patients to help one another and supports evidence based clinical pathways.
4. Explore data and results of a post-occupancy evaluation.

12:45 PM - 2:00 PM

G06: Involving the Younger Generations – Our Future Leaders

Open to Conference Attendees Only

MODERATOR
 
Terence B. Houk AIA, ACHE
Vice President, Senior Healthcare Planner & Programmer, HKS, Inc
SPEAKERS
 
Wayne Ruga, PhD, FAIA, FIIDA, Hon. FASID
Founder and President, The CARITAS Project
Generative Space Experts
, To Be Announced

This program will be a ‘laboratory’ to listen and learn – directly - from Younger Generation Representatives, as they explain how they each imagine they will become our future healthcare design industry leaders and what support they will need to accomplish this. This program will provide a platform for ideas to be freely expressed and discussed without judgement or criticism; enable Younger Generation Representatives to contribute toward the shaping of their futures; and create an opportunity for participants to develop new understandings of future leadership needs. Clearly, as would be evident to even Janus, this program is leading into the uncharted territories of ‘new possibilities’.

This program is the fourth part of the progressive journey of Generative Space Track programs, culminating in a free, all-community event on Wednesday afternoon, 20 September, where the clarity, design, structure, and tangibles of our new future vision will continuously unfold throughout these programs. Attendees are invited to participate in any or all of these programs.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how ‘listening and learning’ are integral elements of Generative Space
2. Understand why ‘listening and learning’ can open up the space for ‘new possibilities’
3. Explore how to listen generatively
4. Hear what is a ‘new paradigm’ and how does it transform mainstream practice.

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

G07: Becoming a More Balanced, Diverse, Inclusive, and Collaborative Healthcare Design Community

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Susan Black
Principal and Director, Perkins Eastman Black Architects Inc
 
Heather Fennimore
President, Global Healthcare, Humanscale
 
Jessica Gutierrez-Rodriguez
Hospital CEO, Texas Center for Infectious Disease
 
Ann M. McGauran AIA, MMHC
Tennessee State Architect, State of Tennessee
 
Elizabeth Melas
Director of Capital Projects, Rush University Medical Center
Renee Kemp Rotan
Director of Grants and Special Projects, Office of the Mayor, Birmingham Alabama
MODERATOR

This program will also be a ‘laboratory’ for listening and learning – this time for the purpose of hearing from Agents of Change, as to how our healthcare design industry (and the HFSE) can become a more healthy reflection of our greater world (as well as becoming a mirror for the world to see the shape of its new, future-self reflected in). However, this is not just an ‘arm-chair’ listening session with smart, successful talking heads. IT IS AN ACTION PROGRAM, where all attendees will be expected to join the team that creates the new future visions. This radical ‘new possibilities’ program will provide a platform for ideas to be freely expressed and discussed without judgement or criticism; enable the Agents of Change to contribute toward the shaping of our collective future; and create an opportunity for participants to develop new understandings of future leadership needs.

At this stage, Janus will be applauding our courage in fearlessly challenging the status quo, and aspiring toward ‘new possibilities’ for a new future.

This program is the fifth part of the progressive journey of Generative Space Track programs, culminating in a free, all-community event on Wednesday afternoon, 20 September, where the clarity, design, structure, and tangibles of our new future vision will continuously unfold throughout these programs. Attendees are invited to participate in any or all of these programs.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how ‘listening and learning’ are integral elements of Generative Space
2. Understand why ‘listening and learning’ can open up the space for ‘new possibilities’
3. Learn how to listen generatively
4. Discover what is a ‘new paradigm’ and how does it transform mainstream practice

4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

G08: The Next 30 Years of Transformation – Mapping the ‘Next Steps’: An Inclusive Community Discussion

Open to Conference Attendees Only

MODERATOR
 
Wayne Ruga, PhD, FAIA, FIIDA, Hon. FASID
Founder and President, The CARITAS Project
SPEAKERS
Generative Space Experts
, To Be Announced

An ‘open space’ program, with the opportunity for all HFSE attendees to openly, freely, and candidly contribute their views about the agenda for the next 30 years, we will actively welcome all input and views; facilitate the expression of creative contributions; value all that is contributed; and provide a structure and prioritization for the realization of ‘Next Steps’. In this program, the new future vision will emerge and become clarified – through discussion, argument, debate, chaos, and confusion. If you have ever wanted to put your own ‘two cents’ into designing our collective healthcare design future, this is the program to attend.

This program is the sixth part of the progressive journey of Generative Space Track programs, culminating in a free, all-community event on Wednesday afternoon, 20 September, where the clarity, design, structure, and tangibles of our new future vision will continuously unfold throughout these programs. Attendees are invited to participate in any or all of these programs.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how to cultivate a more Generative Space to create ‘a place to flourish’®
2. Discover how to discover how to know ‘what we don’t know we don’t know’
3. Understand why future organizations will have ‘heart centers’, rather than ‘headquarters
4. Hear why it is crucial that we value – and listen to, to fully understand – all voices

‘A Place to Flourish’ is a Registered Service Mark of The CARITAS Project. All Rights Reserved.

NOAH Track
Monday, September 18, 2017
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

N01: NOAH Welcome and Arts in Health: Philanthropy

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Todd Frazier
President, NOAH

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM
NOAH Welcome

 

NOAH Board President Todd Frazier, Conference Co-Chairs, NOAH Board

 

10:30 AM - 11:00 AM 
Arts in Health: Philanthropy

 

Report from Grantmakers for the Arts’ Thought Leaders Forum on Arts in Medicine

11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

N02: Arts in Health: Interactive Sessions

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Suzanne Costello
Artistic Co-Director, Stuart Pimsler Dance & Theater
 
Gary Malkin
Co-Creator, Graceful Passages
Jennifer Townsend
Program Manager of Music Therapy, Houston Methodist Hospital in the Texas Medical Center

11:15 AM - 11:35 AM

Suzanne Costello: Stuart Pimsler Dance & Theater: Transforming the Doctor/Patient Relationship - Telling the Story 
Presentation Description:

This workshop, led by Suzanne Costello, will include an overview and positive outcomes of SPDT’s innovative program Transforming the Doctor-Patient Relationship. Participants will be led through a series of movement activities designed to encourage the physician to see their patient as a whole person. The workshop will conclude with Q&A. Costello will also address SPDT’s additional Arts & Healthcare programs.

11:35 AM - 11:55 AM

Jennifer Townsend: Creating a Healing Space: Auditory and Visual Beautification of an Inpatient Acute Psychiatry Unit

Presentation Description:
Many people have seen or experienced the effects of a healing environment within a healthcare setting. Studies confirm that well-designed hospital environments can reduce patients’ anxiety and stress, accelerate recovery, shorten hospitalizations, reduce medication use, lessen pain, and promote a sense of well-being. Therapeutic environments can also help an impact on staff wellness. Outcomes include enhancing staff recruitment, satisfaction, productivity, and retention. This presentation will detail the process of creating a therapeutic environment in an inpatient acute care psychiatric unit, both through visual art and music. The discussion will focus on how to determine the specific needs of a patient population, including safety concerns. Finally, participants will learn about research supporting such efforts

11:55 AM - 12:15 PM

Gary Malkin: Music for health and wellness

Musician Gary Malkin will lead attendees in an interactive session on music and wellness.

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

N03: Arts in Health: Research

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Silvia López Chavez
Artist in Residence, Boston Children's Hospital
Stacey Eckert, MS
Senior Research Assistant, TIRR Memorial Hermann
Carol Herren
Arts in Medicine Program, Texas Children's Cancer Center
Heather Taylor, PhD
Director for the Spinal Cord Injury and Disability Research Center, TIRR Memorial Hermann
Dana Osterling, MT-BC, NMT
Music Therapy Program, Boston Children's Hospital
2:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Heather Taylor, Stacey Eckert, Ernest Frugé, Carol Herron: Characterizing Arts in Medicine Performances and the Impact on Audience Engagement and Mood at a Children’s Cancer Center
 
This study evaluates the impact of Arts in Medicine performances in a pediatric hematology/oncology clinic across four performance types (theater, dance, music, and control). Measures evaluated anxiety, fatigue, mood by parent and patient self-report and ratings of audience affect attention and engagement. Artists' interviews discussing their approach to performances will be discussed.
 
2:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Dana Osterling, Silvia López Chavez: Measuring Health Outcomes: The Creative Arts Program at Boston Children's Hospital
 
This session will focus on methods used to collect data and share evidence indicating the positive impact of art and music at a pediatric medical facility in Boston, MA. Presenters will review findings of preliminary quality improvement research (and share evidence from peer-reviewed studies on Music Therapy and health), discuss current protocol for documenting and measuring impact, and lay out a vision for future research in the field.
3:15 PM - 4:15 PM

N04: Arts in Health: Program Models

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Judy Rollins, PhD, RN
President, Rollins & Associates, Inc.
Elaine Sims
Director, Gifts of Art
3:15 PM - 3:45 PM
Elaine Sims: A New Challenge to Arts in Healthcare Programs at the University of Michigan Health System: Success!
 
At the University of Michigan Health System the arts have been successfully integrated into the organization's culture. This is due to over 30 years of pioneering work by the Gifts of Art program. With the arts so integrated in the organizational culture, how does Gifts of Art maintain its identity, funding, institutional support and recognition? This presentation will focus on challenges and strategies for growth and sustainability.
 
3:45 PM - 4:15 PM
Judy Rollins: Art with Intent in Hospitals
 
There is an emergent movement for contemporary art designed specifically to promote positive outcomes in hospitals. An international study is underway through The Institute for Integrative Health to identify this art and explore perceptions of individuals who create, select, or use it; the principles that guide creation and selection; and evidence regarding outcomes for individuals exposed to the art. This session will present findings to date.
Tuesday, September 19, 2017
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

N05: Arts in Health: Creative Arts Therapies

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Amber Como, MA, RDT
Expressive Therapy Team Lead, Seton Shoal Creek Hospital
Angel C. Duncan, MA-MFT, ATR
Director of Education/Clinician, Neuropsychiatric Research Center of Southwest Florida
Kalila Homann, MA, LPC-S, BC-DMT
Director, Embodied Neurobiology
Della Molloy-Daughtery, MT-BC
Music Therapist, Dell Children's Hospital
Daniela Simmons, Ph.D., PAT
Executive Council, ASGPP
Megan Van Meter, MA, LPC-AT/S, ATR-BC
Art Therapist/Special Education Counselor, Hays Consolidated Independent School District
8:00 AM - 8:40 AM
Amber Como, Kalila Homann, Della Molloy-Daughtery, Daniela Simmons, Megan Van Meter: Creative Arts in Practice
 
This panel discussion aims to explore the use of creative arts therapies in clinical practice though exploring the theoretical & practical approaches to treatment across five creative arts therapies professions. Using a single case study these practitioners will provide attendees with an opportunity to learn about, & create a dialogue around, how creative approaches are effectively being used in the field to impact health outcomes.
 
8:40 AM - 9:00 AM
Angel Duncan: Technologies and Arts Therapy: Creative Interventions for Neurological Disorders
 
The advanced technology of the MIND app will demonstrate where and how to identify technology application steps with a hands-on approach on how to effectively work with those who have cognitive/neurological disorders while utilizing GE Healthcare's cutting-edge technology. Best practices in community arts programming are discussed to address how to start a program, where to identify local support, and implement effective ways to improve quality of life for persons with dementia and their caregivers.
12:45 PM - 2:00 PM

N06: Arts in Health: Arts in the Military

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Ermyn King, MA, RDT
Creative Arts Program Coordinator, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
Jenny Baxley Lee, MA, BC-DMT
Faculty, UF's Center for Arts in Medicine in the College of the Arts
AnnMarie O'Malley, PhD
, Creative Forces: NEA Military Healing Arts Network
Judy Rollins, PhD, RN
President, Rollins & Associates
Darden Smith
Founder and Creative Director, SongWritingWith:Soldiers
Heather Spooner, MA, ATR-BC
, Center for Arts in Medicine
Rebecca Vaudreuil, EdM, MT-BC
Music Therapy Program Lead, National Endowment for the Arts Creative Forces Military Healing Arts Network

12:45 PM - 1:05 PM
Ermyn King, Judy Rollins: A Portfolio of Caring Through the Arts: Creative Services Offered by ArtStream's Artists-in-Residence Team in the USA's Largest Military Medical Center

ArtStream's artists-in-residence (AIR) team has been providing a multifaceted portfolio of creative services for patients, families, and staff in the USA's largest military medical center during recent conflicts and beyond. Thorough AIR training (including vital scope of practice considerations), ongoing evaluation, relationship building and collaboration, and adaptation to changing needs, are all at the core of and assure quality control for AIR services. The team's portfolio has grown to include professional development offerings for healthcare providers and medical and nursing students. A study on its work with children of hospitalized service members with combat injuries appears in a 2015 Arts & Health issue devoted to arts and the military. The session will examine the foundational elements and features, benefits, and impact of this effective, growth-oriented military healthcare AIR initiative, while also addressing challenges and continuous learning involved in its operation.

1:05 PM - 1:25 PM
Darden Smith: Songwriting With:Soldiers -- Changing Lives Through Creativity

Songwriting With: Soldiers founder Darden Smith combines song, spoken word and images to show the importance of bringing art, skilled artists, and collaboration to not only the Veteran community, but to any population that has experienced marginalization, loss or trauma to foster connection, confidence and creativity.

1:25 PM - 2:00 PM

Heather Spooner, Jenny Baxley Lee, AnnMarie O'Malley, Rebecca Vaudreuil: The Creative Forces Telehealth Project: Using Video-Based Technologies to Bridge the Gap Between Clinical and Community Based Arts Programs for Service Members Across the Military Treatment Continuum

This session describes a component of the NEA program Creative Forces that allows veterans to remain engaged with providers through clinical video telehealth as they transition from active duty service to veteran/civilian life (re)integrate into their communities. Telehealth can support veterans in transition in building relationships with community members through the arts as they continue to engage in expressive art forms as part of their healing process.

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

N07: Arts in Health: Research Universities and Education

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Sarah B. Cunningham
Executive Director of Research, Virginia Commonwealth University School of the Arts
Eliza Lamb
Co-Founder and Executive Director, Lamb Institute for Arts and Healing
Jenny Baxley Lee, MA, BC-DMT
Faculty Member, UF's Center for Arts in Medicine in the College of the Arts
Lori Power, BSN, MA, EdD
Faculty Member, University of New England School of Social Works Applied Arts Social Justice
Salem N. Tsegaye
Editor, Createquity

2:40 PM - 3:00 PM 
Lori Power: Applied Arts and Social Justice: It's About Time

This presentation will introduce an innovative new program offered at the University of New England’s Master of Social Work Program: The Applied Arts and Social Justice Certificate. This program formalizes the relationship between the arts and healing, and is the first program of its kind in the United States. Its approach links artists, art therapists, and community activists with social workers, social work students, and community members.

3:00 PM - 3:30 PM
Eliza Lamb, Sarah B. Cunningham, Salem N. Tsegaye: Arts and Health Engagement in American Research Universities 

The Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities (a2ru) and the Arts Research Institute at Virginia Commonwealth University School of the Arts recently surveyed selected research universities about their engagement and partnerships in arts and health. Key findings from this survey will be shared and a group discussion about arts and health in higher education will follow.

3:30 PM - 4:00 PM
Jenny Baxley Lee, Jill Sonke: Engaging Learners in Arts in Health Education in Traditional and Online Environments

Through design and implementation of academic curriculum, faculty at the UF Center for Arts in Medicine have learned a great deal about pedagogy in arts in health education in both traditional and online learning environments. In the spirit of a lively, facilitated discussion, participants will examine aspects of academic programs with the aim to share ideas, deepen discourse and improve excellence in arts in health education internationally.

4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

N08: Arts in Health: Design

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Lisa Burgess
Family Advisory Council, Boston Children's Hospital
Jessica Finch
, Boston Children's Hospital
Anne Garrity
Senior Interior Designer, Shepley Bullfinch
Marty Gregg
Founding Principal and Creative Director, ArtHouse Design
 
Annette Ridenour
President & CEO, Aesthetics Inc
Jill Sullivan, RN, MSN
Vice President, Strategic Space Planning & General Services, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford
4:15 PM - 4:55 PM
Annette Ridenour, Jill Sullivan: Seven Year Journey – The Art Program at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital
 
Imagine an architecturally integrated Art Program, telling the stories of the ecosystems of California with two major gardens commissioned by world famous artists, Trompe-L’oeil Mosaics on two floors creating interactive tide pools on one and the redwood forest on another. Over 40 bronze sculptures of Ambassador Animals greet you on each floor, designed to be playful and interactive. Included in this collection are blown glass dioramas, new immersive interactive technologies and artwork that takes you on a journey throughout the Stanford Campus. This collection contains only original art with 300 pieces of commissioned art and a total collection of almost 500 pieces.  Designed over a five-year period, this process engaged patients, families and an art committee that was made up of donors, architects, designers and department heads from throughout the Hospital. A strong vision was created from the art committee and a call for artists was extended to the artists of California. Come learn from Jill Sullivan, who will tell the story from the owner’s point of view and Annette Ridenour, who will present the journey from the artist and the art’s consultants point-of-view.
 
4:55 PM - 5:35 PM
Jessica Finch, Lisa Burgess, Anne Garrity, Marty Gregg: Best Practices in Interactive and Technology-based Art
 
This session will provide a comprehensive overview of the next generation of technology-based art and explore how interactive artwork can empower patients, giving a much-needed sense of control. Examples from Boston Children’s Hospital include a variety of installed and planned art types; motion-activated, sound installations, projected art, augmented reality, and new ways to use common equipment. Practical information and pros/cons will help attendees understand best practices for including interactive art in your next project. We will explore how interactive art can be an extension of patient-centered design principles, which give families the ability to adjust light levels, room temperature, and levels of privacy. We intend to expand this study and explore the impact of interactive and technology-based art as an effective means to reduce anxiety and agitation.
Wednesday, September 20, 2017
8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

N09: Arts in Health: Creativity and Research in Health Systems

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Napoleon Dargan, Psy.D
Director of Stress Relief Through the Arts, Art of Health and Healing
Lisa Gallagher, MA, MT-BC
Research Program Manager, Arts & Medicine Institute - Cleveland Clinic
Maria Jukic, JD
Executive Director, Arts & Medicine Institute at Cleveland Clinic
Nicki Koethner, MA, MFT
Expressive Arts Therapy Supervisor, Art of Health and Healing
Alan Siegel, MD
, Contra Costa Health Services

8:30 AM - 9:00 AM 
Alan Siegel, Napoleon Dargan, Nicki Koethner: Art of Health and Healing of Contra Costa Health Services

We will provide an overview and implementation toolbox for Art of Health and Healing(AHH) programming. AHH provides our underserved county patients and staff with a wide variety of creative programming through our Expressive Arts Therapy training program, staff support and training, and healing environments. In an experiential, we’ll imbibe the powerful work of our community arts and psycho-education workshop, Stress Reduction Through the Arts.

9:00 AM - 9:30 AM
Lisa Gallagher, Maria Jukic: Research and Evaluation in Arts & Medicine 

The presenters will share their experiences with conducting a wide variety of research projects regarding the use of the arts in medicine. This includes visual arts, performing arts, art therapy, & music therapy. These projects range from the use of surveys to market research to chart reviews to randomized controlled trials. The data that has been obtained is both quantitative and qualitative; and it was gathered from patients, families/ caregivers, and employees. Information learned from the studies will be shared, the importance of applying research in practice will be discussed, and current and future ideas for research will be shared.

9:45 AM - 10:45 AM

N10: Arts in Health: Recovery

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Cindy Perlis
Director, Art for Recovery

9:45 AM - 10:05 AM

Cynthia Perlis: Art for Recovery: Creativity in Healthcare  


Presentation Description:
Art for Recovery is one of the longest running art and healing programs in the country. The history of how this program began in 1988 in the HIV unit at UCSF, the creation of multiple Art for Recovery programs across all three UCSF campuses and in the community that continues today, along with the success in writing grants and obtaining funding throughout the Bay Area will be discussed. In addition, the relationship
that was developed with the UCSF Foundation and the UCSF Department of Medical Humanities that has led to the continued success of this program will be explored. An interactive creative component will be experienced by the audience as well as videos that will give heart to the program.

10:05 AM - 10:45 AM NOAH Closing Session

SESSION FOCUS AREAS: = Generative Space = American Society of Interior Designers = NOAH