Conference By Focus Area

Generative Space
Generative Space Session
Monday, September 29, 2014

SPECIAL EVENTS

9/29/2014  |  12:30 PM - 6:30 PM  |  Separate Registration Required

WS1: Collaborative Conversations – Advancing the Future of Designing for Health(care)

SPEAKERS
 
Sally Augustin PhD
Principal, Design With Science
 
Wayne Ruga, PhD, FAIA, FIIDA, Hon. FASID
Founder and President, The CARITAS Project

This year’s HFSE Pre-Conference Workshop will be yet another extraordinary experience – an afternoon of intense creativity and highly collaborative engagement, working and learning together to formulate a new future for health(care) design…A new future that is calling us to articulate it and to make it tangible.

Twenty-seven years ago, Symposium attendees did just that.  However, it is now time – again – to make a further paradigmatic shift, advancing what was so tenderly birthed twenty-seven years ago.  Today, a new future for healthcare design is necessary – a future to showcase for the next twenty-seven years, as we continue our pioneering tradition in leading the change.

Today, the many challenges are now different – but, consider just these three: 
1. During these past 27 years, healthcare has become much more expensive and access to high quality   care continues to be a need that has not yet been successfully addressed – both because of the   high expense of this care, and also because of the uneven distribution of the quality resources.          
2. The increase of average life expectancy that skyrocketed during the 20th century is levelling-off  in the early decades of this century, and quality of life – for everyone – is a serious concern.     
3. The compelling vision that ‘design leadership’ could transform medical practice and healthcare   seems to have lost its edge – even with more literature and increased exposure to ‘quality design’. 

The ‘community’ of HFSE alumni, 25,000 individuals strong – have the ability to create a new and better future….and do it NOW.  We have the history of having done it, we have the knowledge, the vision, the passion, the resources, the network – all that is missing is simply a new ‘collaborative conversation’, a few bold experiments, and the space to enable us to collaborate in new and different ways – - - precisely what we’ll be doing, together, during the afternoon of 29 September.

For the past twenty-seven years, the Symposium has pushed the envelope on leading innovation – now, in 2014 – it is continuing its tradition with a bold, history-altering experiment.  This is another one of those ‘Symposium firsts’ – be sure to sign up early to reserve your place. 

Workshop Participants Will Learn:
1. How to make systemic and sustainable improvements in lives, organizations, an communities       
2. How to develop exemplars to shift the mainstream paradigm          
3. New methods of collaboration                   
4. New skills and tools that are transportable throughout a range of contexts       
5. How to build ‘community’ in the truest sense of why the Symposium was founded      
6. How to actively contribute towards ‘advancing the future of designing for health(care)’     

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

ROOM 329

9/30/2014  |  10:45 AM - 11:45 AM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G01: Intuitive Creativity as Applied to Designing Healthcare Facilities

SPEAKERS
Gregory Splinter
Principal Architect - Urban Designer, Gensler

This presentation is a participatory, experiential workshop that is two sessions long.  To participate in the second session, attendees will need to have participated in the first session.  Workshop participants will be given the opportunity to intuitively and creatively express themselves – no prior design, drawing, or professional training is required - and all are welcome to participate.

Session One  - Intuitive Design
In Session One, each participant will be guided to create their individual, hand-drawn intuitive images, representing their particular response to the given design challenge.  The objective of this exercise is to encounter this design challenge anew, without hesitation of what it ‘should’ be.  The participant’s intuition will depict the design challenge graphically, as it ‘wants’ to be, without pre-conceived notions and unspoken internal agendas.

The Visual Intuitive Process  - Bringing to life a vision, by using the power of each participant’s intuition, Gregory Splinter will accompany and support the participants throughout this entire envisioning process.

The intuitive process, that each participant will experience, consists of:
Step 1 - The left-brain.
Rationally determining and defining the design challenge.
Step 2 - The right-brain.
Intuitively drawing the intention and feeling of the design challenge.
Step 3 - Left-brain and right-brain combined.
Rationally interpreting the intuitive drawing.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
1.  Understand differences in interaction style characteristics.                                                      
2.  Increase ability to access intuition.                                                              
3.  Learn to graphically represent intuition.                                                               
4.  Learn to interpret intuition into rational graphic expression.
 

 

ROOM 329

9/30/2014  |  12:00 PM - 1:00 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G02: Intuitive Creativity as Applied to Designing Healthcare Facilities

SPEAKERS
Gregory Splinter
Principal Architect - Urban Designer, Gensler

This presentation is a participatory, experiential workshop that is two sessions long.  To participate in the second session, attendees will need to have participated in the first session.  Workshop participants will be given the opportunity to intuitively and creatively express themselves – no prior design, drawing, or professional training is required - and all are welcome to participate.

Session Two  -  From Intuitive to Rational
In Session Two, all intuitive images will be displayed for the group to view. Participants will have the opportunity to describe their personal intuitive experience and interpret the meaning of their own drawing.  Afterwards, each participant will develop their intuitive drawing into a more rational design solution.  By fully incorporating the use of the right-brain in an unrestricted way, design solutions will emerge which might otherwise have gone unnoticed.

Trusting Your Intuition  - All of us have experienced the ‘gut feeling’, which we call intuition.  Visual intuition is a method to get in touch with our personal intuition and to communicate it graphically.  This intuitive method releases the constraints of predominant rational thought and elevates our intuition, enabling groups to feel their way toward the uncompromised best outcome.

Learning Objectives:                                                                                       
1.  Understand differences in interaction style characteristics.                                                      
2.  Increase ability to access intuition.                                                              
3.  Learn to graphically represent intuition.                                                               
4.  Learn to interpret intuition into rational graphic expression.
 

ROOM 329

9/30/2014  |  2:30 PM - 3:30 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G03: Advances in Community Health Design: Learning from Examples of Successful New-Generation Projects

SPEAKERS
Tama Duffy Day FIIDA, FASID
Firmwide Health & Wellness Practice Area Leader, Gensler
Jamie Huffcut EDAC
Workplace Strategist, Gensler

As the US healthcare industry continues to change and respond to The Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act, the industry needs a major re-boot.  The healthcare consumer and their engagement in their community is critical to the consumer’s health success.  As Walgreen’s and CVS expand their accessible retail-based pediatric, optical, and primary care access, consumers appear to be responding positively.  These retail-based service options provide meaningful benefits of: no time off from work; extended hours; and reliable providers.  This discussion will focus on: (1) how community-based health and/or healthcare providers can develop successful responses to their local population needs; and (2) how ‘generative space’ can play a crucial role in the success of designing and delivering these services.
 
LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
1. Learn how the health consumer is engaging with their community in new and fresh ways.
2. Learn how community spaces need to adapt and be more responsive to the unique social and physical  space requirements of local consumers.
3. Compare several project examples to determine how successfully the spaces for their consumers have  been integrated within the overall community.
4. Develop new understandings of how to design a generative process to create ‘a place to flourish®’.

ROOM 329

9/30/2014  |  4:00 PM - 5:00 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G04: The Generative Space Primer: Learning From The 2014 ‘Generative Space Award’ Recipients

SPEAKERS
 
Wayne Ruga, PhD, FAIA, FIIDA, Hon. FASID
Founder and President, The CARITAS Project

Meet the recipients of the 2014 ‘Generative Space Award’ (to be announced). See their submittals; learn from their presentations; engage with these leading pioneers in a discussion about how both systemic and sustainable improvements to health, healthcare, and wellbeing can be made through the design of the environment; and then plan your own strategy for submitting your pioneering projects to the 2015 ‘Generative Space Award’ in June 2015.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
1. Learn how ‘action research’ can be applied to healthcare design projects.
2. Learn how to make systemic and sustainable improvements with generative space.
3. Learn how generative space can improve lives, organizations, and communities.
4. Learn how to make an award-winning submittal to the ‘Generative Space Award’.

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

ROOM 329

10/1/2014  |  8:00 AM - 9:00 AM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G05: Regulatory Change and Person-Centered Care: Working Together

SPEAKERS
Margaret P. Calkins Ph.D.
Senior Fellow Emeritus, Institute on Aging and Environment at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
 
Robert N. Mayer Ph.D.
Co-Founder, Hulda B. and Maurice L. Rothschild Foundation

Regulations used to be routinely cited as a barrier--either real or perceived--to many of the elements of generative space including person-centered built environments and individual choice.  However, the regulatory environment is rapidly changing.  Since 2004, the Rothschild Foundation has worked to build bridges of understanding with the regulatory community around the country, in order to craft regulations more supportive of self-directed, relationship-based care, especially in long term care communities.

This session will briefly review the current progress of the seven Rothschild Regulatory Task Force Initiatives, providing the most current information on changes to national codes and standards that shape both how care is delivered and care communities are designed.  The Initiatives address: the 2012 edition Life Safety Code of the National Fire Protection Association; The Facilities Guidelines Institute’s brand new Guidelines for Design and Construction of Residential Health, Care, and Support Facilities; The Americans with Disability Act Standards for Accessible Design; Dining Practice Standards; the 2015 Edition of the International Building Code; and the NIBS Design Guidelines for the Visual Environment; and Person-Centered Care Planning. 

One impact of these Regulatory Task Force Initiatives is the fostering of a much more collaborative and relationship-based process as opposed to the adversarial relationship typical seen between regulatory bodies and advocates.  The goal of this session is to provide the most up-to-date information to both providers and designers on how various codes are being changed to not just “allow” but to actively support the many elements of generative space and person-centered care.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
1. Understand the powerful impact of the regulatory environment on the design and delivery of generative space and person-centered care.            
2. Learn of the most recently adopted regulatory changes designed to actively support generative space and person-centered care.                                                                        
3. Learn of potential future regulatory changes currently under discussion and review.         
4. Discover ways to participate in providing constructive feedback to regulatory initiatives currently underway.
 

ROOM 329

10/1/2014  |  12:45 PM - 2:00 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G06: Behavioral Health Facilities: Research to Support Generative Space Design

SPEAKERS
Mardelle McCuskey Shepley, D.Arch., FAIA, FACHA, EDAC, LEED AP
Professor and Director, Center for Health Systems & Design at Texas A&M University

Of all the typologies for healthcare environments, behavioral health facilities have received the least support regarding creating an understanding of the needs of patients and staff.  Rather than allowing patients to flourish while under treatment, these environments tend to work against the goals of therapy.  One way to rectify the lack of synergy between caregiving and the physical environment is to conduct research.  Quality research is critical to socially responsible professional practice, and is playing an increasingly larger role in design practice.  This presentation will summarize the relevant research associated with the design of behavioral health facilities, with the objective of contributing to an agenda for increasing the application of generative space design. 

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
1. Gain an understanding of the research literature associated with the design of behavioral health facilities
2. Become aware of design goals that might contribute to therapeutic and generative environments in behavioral health settings
3. Learn about the critical role of research in the design process
4. Become informed about the guidelines associated with behavioral health facilities

ROOM 329

10/1/2014  |  3:00 PM - 4:00 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G07: How to bring generative space into the lives of young people with dementia (YD) and their families?

SPEAKERS
 
Fiona de Vos PhD
Owner, Studio dVO

When living at home is no longer possible, patients with early onset dementia (YD) are institutionalized.  In the Netherlands, the number of specialized environments for YD is slowly growing.  However, most YD patients are institutionalized in environments designed for patients over 80.  In these settings, the mismatch between the needs of the YD and the environment are experienced by staff, patients, and families.  In general, these environments have very little to offer to the physically active and strong YD.  Also, the environment is not appealing to the more diverse population of YD and their families.
If we better understand the needs of YD and their families, we can create more generative spaces for them.  The main purpose of this presentation is to reveal some of the building blocks of a more generative space for YD people.  This presentation will explore –
How can we create places to flourish for YD people, their partners, children, relatives, and visitors within our communities, at home, and in institutions?
How can healthcare providers extend their services for YD people into the community?  How can they take a more proactive approach in reaching out to YD still living at home, through assistance at home, social support, social networks, daytime activities, professional guidance etc.?
What can be done to change our perception of people living with dementia (young and old) so that we start seeing them as people that can still play a role in our society despite their illness?
How can we change the dementia stigma and see the people behind the illness? If we raise awareness around the illness as a society, people with early onset dementia may be able to keep their job longer, participate in activities, etc. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:              
1. Understand the challenges that face YD people and their loved ones
2. Learn about the qualities and building blocks of a more generative space for YD people, their families and staff at home, in the community and while living at a healthcare provider organization.
3. Understand the changing role and responsibilities of the community and the healthcare providers in order to create a more generative space.
4. Explore further possibilities to create a more generative space for YD people, their families, and staff in our communities.

ROOM 329

10/1/2014  |  4:15 PM - 5:15 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G08: Extending ‘Behavioral Health Environments’: A New Collaborative Conversation to Explore How We Can Build a More Healthy World Together

SPEAKERS
 
Heather Fennimore
President, Global Healthcare, Humanscale
 
Fiona de Vos PhD
Owner, Studio dVO
Jessica Gutierrez-Rodriguez
Assistant Superintendent, Texas Department of State Health Services
 
BJ Miller, ASID, CCIM
President, The Vision Group Studios, LLC
Francis Murdock Pitts FACHA, AIA, OAA
President, architecture+
Mardelle McCuskey Shepley, D.Arch., FAIA, FACHA, EDAC, LEED AP
Professor and Director, Center for Health Systems & Design at Texas A&M University

‘Behavioral health’ care environments seem to be a new euphemism for what used-to-be called Psychiatric Care Facilities, Mental Health Facilities, and/or Dementia Care Facilities.  However, if we consider that all health and healthcare environments – whether they be hospitals, doctors’ offices, schools, workplaces, communities – can benefit from improved individual responsibility for personal behavior (for example – improved personal responsibility for behavior could increase rates of medical compliance in all medical settings, reduce drug and alcohol abuse, reduce incidents of infection, and even deliver more caring healthcare) then we might begin thinking more systemically about how we can more effectively improve health with innovative design of the environment.

This presentation will be a highly participatory and interactive session where the entire group of assembled presenters and attendees will explore this possibility and determine its own conclusion – and possible next steps.  The presentation will be moderated and provoked by individuals who have both specific expertise in ‘behavioral health environments’ and generative space.

The moderator will introduce and manage the discussion, and each of the expert panelists will briefly present their own personal point of view.  Attendees will then have the opportunity to engage with the experts in a lively ‘collaborative conversation’ to explore new design possibilities.  All are welcome to participate and all points of view are actively encouraged.  This is ‘the place to be’ if you are planning to lead the future of health and design…..

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: 
1.  Learn new approaches to improving health with design of the environment
2.  Develop new understandings of how to design behavioral health environments    
3.  Participate in a experiment in cultivating a more generative learning space 
4. Identify potentially new collaborative opportunities             
    

SESSION FOCUS AREAS: = American Society of Interior Designers = Generative Space