Conference By Focus Area

American Society of Interior Designers
Sessions hosted by ASID
Tuesday, September 30, 2014

ROOM 325

9/30/2014  |  10:45 AM - 11:45 AM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

D01: The Experience Team: Delivering Our Promise to Patients & Families

SPEAKERS
 
Ellen Belknap AIA ACHA ACHE LEED AP EDAC
President, SMRT Architects and Engineers
 
Erin Anderson NCIDQ IIDA LEED AP
Director of Interior Design, SMRT Architects and Engineers
 
Jennifer Riggs, RN
Administrative Director, MaineGeneral Alfond Center for Health
 
Steve Wiley
Senior Project Manager, Robins & Morton
 
Stacey Yeragotelis LEED AP
Associate Principal, TRO Jung|Brannen

“Improving the experience of care” is the rallying cry in the current dialogue regarding the future of healthcare delivery. How do we really achieve this goal? The team that planned designed and constructed MaineGeneral's new 640 000 sf Alfond Center for Health established a bold vision to address The Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s Triple Aim. An “Experience Team” comprised of clinicians administrators purchasing philanthropy contractors and designers collaborated to ensure the new hospital would improve the patient /family experience. The team vetted design decisions through a five lens filter: impact on patients families staff physicians and cost. Experience team members will discuss their process to achieve an extraordinary patient care environment: • Team composition • Design objectives • Mock-ups/materials • Furniture selection • Signage and Wayfinding • Patient/staff feedback • Integrated Project Delivery: Informing the Process • Achievements/Outcomes

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understand  assess & interpret those aspects of the new 640 000 sf hospital’s architecture that promote physical  mental and social well being.
2. Assess  evaluate & integrate aspects of design engendering positive emotional and physical responses  allowing patients to have control and choice.
3. Understand how collaboration results in a LEED Gold hospital in a harsh climate  returning $1.2 million annually to the owner in energy savings.
4. Recognize how the narrative “healing enhanced by nature  a journey to wellness” guided the process to create an extraordinary patient environment. 

ROOM 326

9/30/2014  |  12:00 PM - 1:00 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

E02: Healthy Environments For Autism

SPEAKERS
 
Jaques Black
President, daSILVA Architects
 
Catherine Lord, PhD
Director of The Center for Autism and the Developing Brain, NYPresbyterian Hospital

This presentation will explore the dynamic between the built environment- with its attributes of acoustics visual character spatial quality color texture geometry etc - and the behavior of individuals with ASD. Autism is a developmental disorder characterized by delayed communication skills challenged social interaction and repetitive behavior. By understanding the mechanisms of this disorder and consequent needs of the autistic user this environment may be designed favorably to alter the sensory input and create a predictable environment conducive of skill development and learning. A case study of the specific issues related to the design of environments for persons on the Autism spectrum (The Center for Autism and the Developing Brain at New York-Presbyterian Hospital) will also be presented.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how to balance environmental concerns with creation of therapeutic space for persons on the spectrum.
2. Sensitivity to spatial design concerns for autistic patients
3. Understand acoustical  light  air  and materials that contribute to the creation of a healthful environment for persons on the spectrum
4. Be aware of current trends in the design of therapeutic environments

 

ROOM 203

9/30/2014  |  2:30 PM - 3:30 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

B03: Remember the “E” Word: “ERGONOMICS”- Its Benefits in Health Care Design

SPEAKER
 
Yeu-Li Yeung
Patient Care Ergonomics Coordinator, Duke University & Health System

Many hospitals are renovating or designing workspaces to accommodate safe patient handling equipment and computers due to new practice standards and the launch of electronic medical record. This session will use case studies to illustrate the importance of incorporating ergonomic concepts into the design of patient care areas and the selection of office furniture computer equipment and patient handling equipment; along with their placement to ensure safety accessibility and satisfaction for the patients and staff.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn to apply ergonomic concepts in workspace design  selection and placement of furniture  patient handling equipment and computer equipment.
2. Learn how ergonomics can facilitate compliance of new health care practice guidelines and national standards.
3. Discuss case studies about physical environment design at in- and out-patient areas and the impact on falls prevention and safe patient handling.
4. Discuss case studies on the selection and placement of furniture and computer equipment to promote customer service  comfort  and safety. 

ROOM 326

9/30/2014  |  2:30 PM - 3:30 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

E03: Innovation in Integrated Technology, Environment and Personalized Care

SPEAKERS
 
Annette Ridenour
President & CEO, Aesthetics Inc
 
David Schmitzerle, LEED AP
Associate, HKS
 
Jack Weiner
President & CEO, St. Joseph Mercy Oakland

This presentation will describe the evolution of St. Joseph Mercy Oakland Hospital which opened its new patient tower in April 2014. In the design of this facility the components were simultaneously designed to create the future of patient care: • A Patient Care Experience that supports each person on their healing journey • Integrated technology that improves infection control pain assessment patient education and involvement and clinical quality initiatives • Physical environment designed to provide comfort efficiency and beauty utilizing evidence based design principals • An integrated arts program of Michigan artists commissioned to create unique pieces that reflect the organization values and faith based mission.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how to work with technology companies to collaborate on improving quality and patient outcomes.
2. Learn about the three-year journey to enroll and engage staff in creating optimum and personalized experiences.
3. Learn how the design of the building set the stage for all innovation.
4. Learn how the design of a regional arts program celebrates the talent of the community while communicating the mission and values of the organization.
 

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

ROOM 203

10/1/2014  |  8:00 AM - 9:00 AM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

B05: The Body Speaks: Learning from our Mistakes

SPEAKER
 
Deborah Burnett
Principal, Benya Burnett Consultancy

Within the current climate of healthcare accountability, it is time for the design community to examine its' contribution to the current state of poor health including:  disease initiation, inability for occupants to sleep, and suboptimal environments in which to heal effectively. With an "ego-sensitive" approach, this session will examine how past health care design solutions, originally intended to improve outcomes, have instead failed to deliver patient safety and staff wellness outcomes.   Examining current scientific and medical evidence- based data vs design based research the influence of the built environment to drive upon physiological, neuroendocrine, and behavioral response will provide facility stakeholders, design teams, and healthcare administrators, with a visual example of what not to do, and more importantly, understand why they should never repeat the same mistake…. even if in the name of modern design trends, lack of widely accepted practice, or perceived higher cost.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Assess & question current practice in wayfinding, views, and lighting, which is expected to deliver improved occupant health, wellness, and safety
2. Specify new design guidelines targeting occupant improvement in visual assessment,   orientation, stress reduction, sleep, and wound healing
3. Translate scientific discovery into buildable solutions which improve health outcomes, reduce LOS, deter re-admissions, and mitigate staff errors
4. Recognize past design mistakes and apply evidence based solutions predicated upon critical occupant neurophysiological and circadian requirements

ROOM 203

10/1/2014  |  3:00 PM - 4:00 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

B07: Design and Health: Proving Value Through Outcomes and Reimbursements

SPEAKERS
Charles A. Brown
Senior Manager, Healthcare, ECG Management Consultants
Daniel A. Willis
Manager, Healthcare, ECG Management Consultants
The healthcare landscape is complicated. From changing laws to a growing body of research, designers have an increased role and responsibility in creating spaces that not only heal, but also provide value to complex systems. ASID has long been a proponent of evidence-based design and continues to invest in research around the ways interior design has an impact on the human experience. Learn about the implications and opportunities made possible from the Affordable Care Act and how to communicate the possibility of thoughtful and proven design strategies. Distinguish yourself in the marketplace by proving outcomes. And demonstrate the return on investment in an increasingly complex environment.

ROOM 326

10/1/2014  |  4:15 PM - 5:15 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

E08: Hospital Replacement Model for Doing “More With Less” Healthcare Projects

SPEAKERS
 
Dan Dowell PE, CCM
Project Manager, CH2M HILL
 
Jodie Jones PMP
Owner’s Authorized Representative, Oregon Health Authority (OHA)

Like operations in many other arenas healthcare facilities are under increasing pressure to do “more with less” in an era of increased competition economic stress and scarce capital. We will share a case study of the Oregon State Hospital Replacement Project in Salem Oregon as a dramatic example of leveraging healthcare facility redevelopment dollars. This site is part of a $508.5 million initiative that transformed one of the oldest mental health facilities in the nation (operating since 1883) into a modern recovery-based model of care which won an award for construction management excellence. The presentation will reveal strategies successfully applied to complete this 620-bed 850,027-square-foot hospital ahead of schedule and $9.5 million under budget all while permitting continuous operation of the facility originally considered “impossible” by the owner. The presentation will review the facility’s unique sustainability features and “treatment mall” design to support a recovery-based model of care.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Meeting cost and schedule targets for large-scale healthcare facility renovation projects.
2. Integrating sustainability features and infrastructure into aging structures.
3. Maintaining operation of healthcare facilities during major renovation projects.
4. Meeting The Joint Commission (TJC) requirements and dealing with regulatory issues pertaining to rehabilitation of facilities designated National Historic Buildings.

Thursday, October 2, 2014

ROOM 324

10/2/2014  |  8:00 AM - 9:00 AM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

B09: Healthcare Facility Roadmap: Build a better bottom-line without new buildings

SPEAKERS
 
Paula Crowley
Chief Executive Officer, Anchor Health Properties
 
Matthew Greis
Director of Facilities, St. Elizabeth Healthcare
 
Patricia D. Malick, AAHID, EDAC, LGB
Practice Area Leader Interior Design, Array Architects, Inc.

In our high-risk/reward environment strategically allocating funds for capital improvements/taking timely action to implement is imperative. While it’s tempting to over analyze and develop a long-range capital plan there are times where a focused strategic response is required. In a marketplace with a high percentage of independent providers and savvy consumers there are times when systems need to do something NOW. The “Roadmap” offers a thoughtful financially driven efficient methodology that brings diverse experts and stakeholders together in innovative ways to achieve consensus driven solutions that are action-oriented to realize immediate results. The Roadmap success story included a 120-day strategic planning session and completion of 9 projects in 2 years. Each project boosted patient satisfaction increased market share improved care delivery enhanced the brand by weaving thoughtful interior design efforts throughout 4 campuses.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understand the differences between the nimble Roadmap Approach and a complicated Facilities Master Plan.
2. Identify how the Roadmap process can improve your ROI across service lines.
3. Use the Roadmap as a strategic planning tool to gain consensus and implement projects that augment its strategic mission for each campus.
4. Identify the System’s leaders who need to be involved in creating the Roadmap and the process to get the job done quickly & with quantifiable results. 

 

ROOM 324

10/2/2014  |  9:15 AM - 10:15 AM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

B10: Identifying the Positive in Oncology Environments

SPEAKERS
 
Mark R. Haggard MBA
Senior Business Director, Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
 
Angela Mazzi AIA, ACHA, EDAC
Healthcare Planner, GBBN Architects
 
Erin Schmidt, IIDA, NCIDQ, LEED AP ID+C
Interior Designer, GBBN Architects

Oncology patients have unique sense of coherence needs deriving from prolonged hospital stays followed by months of follow up outpatient lasting up to several hours. At Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center’s Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute we designed an oncology inpatient unit and a clinic utilizing generative design strategies. To support recovery we created empowering spaces where patients could develop positive associations by overlaying personal choice environment aesthetics and innovative space planning to create an optimistic care environment emphasizing “normal” activities over “sick” ones. Our approach focused on providing choices and variety to allow patents to assert control over even small decisions. We will cover how we developed a cohesive design concept with effective personal space by incorporating psychological and sociological research with patient feedback to design meaningful spaces for socialization and community within a clinical environment.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: 

1. Identify the unique psychosocial needs of oncology patients
2. Compare and contrast the effectiveness of various design elements in promoting socialization
3. Name specific amenities that can provide patients with a greater sense of control over the management of their care
4. Discuss the role of color and art in healing
 

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Generative Space
Generative Space Session
Monday, September 29, 2014

SPECIAL FEATURES

9/29/2014  |  12:30 PM - 6:30 PM  |  Separate Registration Required

WS1: Collaborative Conversations – Advancing the Future of Designing for Health(care)

SPEAKERS
 
Sally Augustin PhD
Principal, Design With Science
 
Wayne Ruga, PhD, FAIA, FIIDA, Hon. FASID
Founder and President, The CARITAS Project
 
Deborah Burnett
Principal, Benya Burnett Consultancy
 
Fiona de Vos PhD
Owner, Studio dVO
 
Tama Duffy Day FIIDA, FASID
Firmwide Health & Wellness Practice Area Leader, Gensler
 
Heather Fennimore
President, Global Healthcare, Humanscale
 
Jessica Gutierrez-Rodriguez
Assistant Superintendent, Texas Department of State Health Services
 
Francis Murdock Pitts FACHA, FAIA, OAA
President, architecture+
 
Bruce Raber
Vice President, Practice Leader for Healthcare, Stantec Architecture
 
Annette Ridenour
President & CEO, Aesthetics Inc

This year’s HFSE Pre-Conference Workshop will be yet another extraordinary experience – an afternoon of intense creativity and highly collaborative engagement, working and learning together to formulate a new future for health(care) design…A new future that is calling us to articulate it and to make it tangible.

Twenty-seven years ago, Symposium attendees did just that.  However, it is now time – again – to make a further paradigmatic shift, advancing what was so tenderly birthed twenty-seven years ago.  Today, a new future for healthcare design is necessary – a future to showcase for the next twenty-seven years, as we continue our pioneering tradition in leading the change.

 

For the past twenty-seven years, the Symposium has pushed the envelope on leading innovation – now, in 2014 – it is continuing its tradition with a bold, history-altering experiment.  This is another one of those ‘Symposium firsts’ – be sure to sign up early to reserve your place. 

For complete description please click here.  

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

ROOM 329

9/30/2014  |  10:45 AM - 11:45 AM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G01: Intuitive Creativity as Applied to Designing Healthcare Facilities

SPEAKERS
 
Gregory Splinter
Principal Architect - Urban Designer, Gensler

This presentation is a participatory, experiential workshop that is two sessions long.  To participate in the second session, attendees will need to have participated in the first session.  Workshop participants will be given the opportunity to intuitively and creatively express themselves – no prior design, drawing, or professional training is required - and all are welcome to participate.

Session One  - Intuitive Design
In Session One, each participant will be guided to create their individual, hand-drawn intuitive images, representing their particular response to the given design challenge.  The objective of this exercise is to encounter this design challenge anew, without hesitation of what it ‘should’ be.  The participant’s intuition will depict the design challenge graphically, as it ‘wants’ to be, without pre-conceived notions and unspoken internal agendas.

The Visual Intuitive Process  - Bringing to life a vision, by using the power of each participant’s intuition, Gregory Splinter will accompany and support the participants throughout this entire envisioning process.

The intuitive process, that each participant will experience, consists of:
Step 1 - The left-brain.
Rationally determining and defining the design challenge.
Step 2 - The right-brain.
Intuitively drawing the intention and feeling of the design challenge.
Step 3 - Left-brain and right-brain combined.
Rationally interpreting the intuitive drawing.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
1.  Understand differences in interaction style characteristics.                                                      
2.  Increase ability to access intuition.                                                              
3.  Learn to graphically represent intuition.                                                               
4.  Learn to interpret intuition into rational graphic expression.
 

 

ROOM 329

9/30/2014  |  12:00 PM - 1:00 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G02: Intuitive Creativity as Applied to Designing Healthcare Facilities

SPEAKERS
 
Gregory Splinter
Principal Architect - Urban Designer, Gensler

This presentation is a participatory, experiential workshop that is two sessions long.  To participate in the second session, attendees will need to have participated in the first session.  Workshop participants will be given the opportunity to intuitively and creatively express themselves – no prior design, drawing, or professional training is required - and all are welcome to participate.

Session Two  -  From Intuitive to Rational
In Session Two, all intuitive images will be displayed for the group to view. Participants will have the opportunity to describe their personal intuitive experience and interpret the meaning of their own drawing.  Afterwards, each participant will develop their intuitive drawing into a more rational design solution.  By fully incorporating the use of the right-brain in an unrestricted way, design solutions will emerge which might otherwise have gone unnoticed.

Trusting Your Intuition  - All of us have experienced the ‘gut feeling’, which we call intuition.  Visual intuition is a method to get in touch with our personal intuition and to communicate it graphically.  This intuitive method releases the constraints of predominant rational thought and elevates our intuition, enabling groups to feel their way toward the uncompromised best outcome.

Learning Objectives:                                                                                       
1.  Understand differences in interaction style characteristics.                                                      
2.  Increase ability to access intuition.                                                              
3.  Learn to graphically represent intuition.                                                               
4.  Learn to interpret intuition into rational graphic expression.
 

SPECIAL FEATURES

9/30/2014  |  2:30 PM - 3:30 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

A03: Completely Reimagining Outpatient Health and Wellness Environments

SPEAKERS
 
Terence B. Houk AIA, ACHE
Associate Principal – the Eckroth Planning Group, Student Charette Co-Creator
 
David M. Nienhueser, Associate AIA, ACHE
Senior Associate – Kaufman Hall, Student Charette Co-Creator

CannonDesign is proud to sponsor the return of the Student Charette for its second year (a partnership of AIA Chicago, the AIA Chicago Healthcare Knowledge Community – CAIA HCKC, and The CARITAS Project), providing the remarkable opportunity for new and advanced learning – both for the students, who are stretching the boundaries of their design imagination, and for Symposium attendees who interact with the wonder of these students.  This year’s design challenge: ‘Re-Imagining Healthcare Places that Provide Outpatient Services’ is a prescient concern to all of us, as we navigate towards a new era of health and healthcare that privileges wellness and prevention, rather than pathology and cure.  Terence Houk and Nienhueser will moderate with a panel of experts. 

For complete details on the sessions please click here

 

ROOM 205

9/30/2014  |  2:30 PM - 3:30 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

A03: Completely Reimagining Outpatient Health and Wellness Environments

SPEAKERS
 
Terence B. Houk AIA, ACHE
Associate Principal – the Eckroth Planning Group, Student Charette Co-Creator
 
David M. Nienhueser, Associate AIA, ACHE
Senior Associate – Kaufman Hall, Student Charette Co-Creator
 
Deborah Burnett
Principal, Benya Burnett Consultancy
 
Fiona de Vos PhD
Owner, Studio dVO
 
Robert N. Mayer Ph.D.
Co-Founder, Hulda B. and Maurice L. Rothschild Foundation
 
Bruce Raber
Vice President, Practice Leader for Healthcare, Stantec Architecture
 
Robert Schaefer AIA
Vice-President and Senior Project Architect, Anderson Mikos Architects, Ltd.

CannonDesign is proud to sponsor the return of the Student Charette for its second year (a partnership of AIA Chicago, the AIA Chicago Healthcare Knowledge Community – CAIA HCKC, and The CARITAS Project), providing the remarkable opportunity for new and advanced learning – both for the students, who are stretching the boundaries of their design imagination, and for Symposium attendees who interact with the wonder of these students.  This year’s design challenge: ‘Re-Imagining Healthcare Places that Provide Outpatient Services’ is a prescient concern to all of us, as we navigate towards a new era of health and healthcare that privileges wellness and prevention, rather than pathology and cure.

In this two-part Generative Space Track ‘Special Event’, the students from a range of design schools will share their learning and new visions with attendees, as they endeavour to imagine new visions to overcome the very issues that have so constrained – both – the more widespread availability, as well as the more progressive approaches to this mode of service.

Part One will include introductions, an overall briefing and orientation, and the actual student presentations.  Part Two will have two elements: the first half will consist of a Panel of Experts in the field of Generative Space and Design Industry Leaders, who will offer their responses and questions to the students’ design presentations; while the second half will be devoted to overall audience interaction and discussion.  Note that attendees may attend either or both of these presentation sessions.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1.  Learn new approaches to designing outpatient health and healthcare services.                           
2.  Learn how to apply Generative Space design principles to health and healthcare service settings.                                         
3.  Learn how to conceptualize and document designs intended to make both systemic and sustainable improvements.                   
4.  Learn relevant new information that could inform current and future projects. 

 Terence B Houk and David M Nienhueser will serve as moderators with a panel of experts.

ROOM 329

9/30/2014  |  2:30 PM - 3:30 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G03: Advances in Community Health Design: Learning from Examples of Successful New-Generation Projects

SPEAKERS
 
Tama Duffy Day FIIDA, FASID
Firmwide Health & Wellness Practice Area Leader, Gensler
 
Jamie Huffcut EDAC
Health & Wellness Regional Practice Area Leader, Southeast, Gensler

As the US healthcare industry continues to change and respond to The Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act, the industry needs a major re-boot.  The healthcare consumer and their engagement in their community is critical to the consumer’s health success.  As Walgreen’s and CVS expand their accessible retail-based pediatric, optical, and primary care access, consumers appear to be responding positively.  These retail-based service options provide meaningful benefits of: no time off from work; extended hours; and reliable providers.  This discussion will focus on: (1) how community-based health and/or healthcare providers can develop successful responses to their local population needs; and (2) how ‘generative space’ can play a crucial role in the success of designing and delivering these services.
 
LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
1. Learn how the health consumer is engaging with their community in new and fresh ways.
2. Learn how community spaces need to adapt and be more responsive to the unique social and physical  space requirements of local consumers.
3. Compare several project examples to determine how successfully the spaces for their consumers have  been integrated within the overall community.
4. Develop new understandings of how to design a generative process to create ‘a place to flourish®’.

SPECIAL FEATURES

9/30/2014  |  4:00 PM - 5:00 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

A04: Completely Reimagining Outpatient Health and Wellness Environments

SPEAKERS
 
Terence B. Houk AIA, ACHE
Associate Principal – the Eckroth Planning Group, Student Charette Co-Creator
 
David M. Nienhueser, Associate AIA, ACHE
Senior Associate – Kaufman Hall, Student Charette Co-Creator

CannonDesign is proud to sponsor the return of the Student Charette for its second year (a partnership of AIA Chicago, the AIA Chicago Healthcare Knowledge Community – CAIA HCKC, and The CARITAS Project), providing the remarkable opportunity for new and advanced learning – both for the students, who are stretching the boundaries of their design imagination, and for Symposium attendees who interact with the wonder of these students.  This year’s design challenge: ‘Re-Imagining Healthcare Places that Provide Outpatient Services’ is a prescient concern to all of us, as we navigate towards a new era of health and healthcare that privileges wellness and prevention, rather than pathology and cure.

Terence B Houk and David M Nienhueser will serve as moderators with a panel of experts.

For complete information on the sessions please click here

 

ROOM 205

9/30/2014  |  4:00 PM - 5:00 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

A04: Completely Reimagining Outpatient Health and Wellness Environments

SPEAKERS
 
Terence B. Houk AIA, ACHE
Associate Principal – the Eckroth Planning Group, Student Charette Co-Creator
 
David M. Nienhueser, Associate AIA, ACHE
Senior Associate – Kaufman Hall, Student Charette Co-Creator
 
Deborah Burnett
Principal, Benya Burnett Consultancy
 
Fiona de Vos PhD
Owner, Studio dVO
 
Robert N. Mayer Ph.D.
Co-Founder, Hulda B. and Maurice L. Rothschild Foundation
 
Bruce Raber
Vice President, Practice Leader for Healthcare, Stantec Architecture
 
Robert Schaefer AIA
Vice-President and Senior Project Architect, Anderson Mikos Architects, Ltd.

The AIA/TCP Student Design Charette returns to the HFSE for its second year (a partnership of AIA Chicago, the AIA Chicago Healthcare Knowledge Community – CAIA HCKC, and The CARITAS Project), providing the remarkable opportunity for new and advanced learning – both for the students, who are stretching the boundaries of their design imagination, and for Symposium attendees who interact with the wonder of these students.  This year’s design challenge: ‘Re-Imagining Healthcare Places that Provide Outpatient Services’ is a prescient concern to all of us, as we navigate towards a new era of health and healthcare that privileges wellness and prevention, rather than pathology and cure.

In this two-part Generative Space Track ‘Special Event’, the students from a range of design schools will share their learning and new visions with attendees, as they endeavour to imagine new visions to overcome the very issues that have so constrained – both – the more widespread availability, as well as the more progressive approaches to this mode of service.

Part One will include introductions, an overall briefing and orientation, and the actual student presentations.  Part Two will have two elements: the first half will consist of a Panel of Experts in the field of Generative Space and Design Industry Leaders, who will offer their responses and questions to the students’ design presentations; while the second half will be devoted to overall audience interaction and discussion.  Note that attendees may attend either or both of these presentation sessions.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1.  Learn new approaches to designing outpatient health and healthcare services.                           
2.  Learn how to apply Generative Space design principles to health and healthcare service settings.                                         
3.  Learn how to conceptualize and document designs intended to make both systemic and sustainable improvements.                   
4.  Learn relevant new information that could inform current and future projects. 

Terence B Houk and David M Nienhueser will serve as moderators with a panel of experts.

 

ROOM 329

9/30/2014  |  4:00 PM - 5:00 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G04: The Generative Space Primer: Learning From The 2014 ‘Generative Space Award’ Recipients

SPEAKERS
 
Wayne Ruga, PhD, FAIA, FIIDA, Hon. FASID
Founder and President, The CARITAS Project

Meet the recipients of the 2014 ‘Generative Space Award’ (to be announced). See their submittals; learn from their presentations; engage with these leading pioneers in a discussion about how both systemic and sustainable improvements to health, healthcare, and wellbeing can be made through the design of the environment; and then plan your own strategy for submitting your pioneering projects to the 2015 ‘Generative Space Award’ in June 2015.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
1. Learn how ‘action research’ can be applied to healthcare design projects.
2. Learn how to make systemic and sustainable improvements with generative space.
3. Learn how generative space can improve lives, organizations, and communities.
4. Learn how to make an award-winning submittal to the ‘Generative Space Award’.

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

ROOM 329

10/1/2014  |  8:00 AM - 9:00 AM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G05: Regulatory Change and Person-Centered Care: Working Together

SPEAKERS
 
Margaret P. Calkins Ph.D.
Program Coordinator, Master in Health Care Design and Associate Professor, College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Kent State University
 
Robert N. Mayer Ph.D.
Co-Founder, Hulda B. and Maurice L. Rothschild Foundation

Regulations used to be routinely cited as a barrier--either real or perceived--to many of the elements of generative space including person-centered built environments and individual choice.  However, the regulatory environment is rapidly changing.  Since 2004, the Rothschild Foundation has worked to build bridges of understanding with the regulatory community around the country, in order to craft regulations more supportive of self-directed, relationship-based care, especially in long term care communities.

This session will briefly review the current progress of the seven Rothschild Regulatory Task Force Initiatives, providing the most current information on changes to national codes and standards that shape both how care is delivered and care communities are designed.  The Initiatives address: the 2012 edition Life Safety Code of the National Fire Protection Association; The Facilities Guidelines Institute’s brand new Guidelines for Design and Construction of Residential Health, Care, and Support Facilities; The Americans with Disability Act Standards for Accessible Design; Dining Practice Standards; the 2015 Edition of the International Building Code; and the NIBS Design Guidelines for the Visual Environment; and Person-Centered Care Planning. 

One impact of these Regulatory Task Force Initiatives is the fostering of a much more collaborative and relationship-based process as opposed to the adversarial relationship typical seen between regulatory bodies and advocates.  The goal of this session is to provide the most up-to-date information to both providers and designers on how various codes are being changed to not just “allow” but to actively support the many elements of generative space and person-centered care.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
1. Understand the powerful impact of the regulatory environment on the design and delivery of generative space and person-centered care.            
2. Learn of the most recently adopted regulatory changes designed to actively support generative space and person-centered care.                                                                        
3. Learn of potential future regulatory changes currently under discussion and review.         
4. Discover ways to participate in providing constructive feedback to regulatory initiatives currently underway.
 

ROOM 329

10/1/2014  |  12:45 PM - 2:00 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G06: Behavioral Health Facilities: Research to Support Generative Space Design

SPEAKERS
 
Mardelle McCuskey Shepley, D.Arch., FAIA, FACHA, EDAC, LEED AP
Professor and Director, Center for Health Systems & Design at Texas A&M University

Of all the typologies for healthcare environments, behavioral health facilities have received the least support regarding creating an understanding of the needs of patients and staff.  Rather than allowing patients to flourish while under treatment, these environments tend to work against the goals of therapy.  One way to rectify the lack of synergy between caregiving and the physical environment is to conduct research.  Quality research is critical to socially responsible professional practice, and is playing an increasingly larger role in design practice.  This presentation will summarize the relevant research associated with the design of behavioral health facilities, with the objective of contributing to an agenda for increasing the application of generative space design. 

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
1. Gain an understanding of the research literature associated with the design of behavioral health facilities
2. Become aware of design goals that might contribute to therapeutic and generative environments in behavioral health settings
3. Learn about the critical role of research in the design process
4. Become informed about the guidelines associated with behavioral health facilities

ROOM 329

10/1/2014  |  3:00 PM - 4:00 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G07: How to bring generative space into the lives of young people with dementia (YD) and their families?

SPEAKERS
 
Fiona de Vos PhD
Owner, Studio dVO

When living at home is no longer possible, patients with early onset dementia (YD) are institutionalized.  In the Netherlands, the number of specialized environments for YD is slowly growing.  However, most YD patients are institutionalized in environments designed for patients over 80.  In these settings, the mismatch between the needs of the YD and the environment are experienced by staff, patients, and families.  In general, these environments have very little to offer to the physically active and strong YD.  Also, the environment is not appealing to the more diverse population of YD and their families.
If we better understand the needs of YD and their families, we can create more generative spaces for them.  The main purpose of this presentation is to reveal some of the building blocks of a more generative space for YD people.  This presentation will explore –
How can we create places to flourish for YD people, their partners, children, relatives, and visitors within our communities, at home, and in institutions?
How can healthcare providers extend their services for YD people into the community?  How can they take a more proactive approach in reaching out to YD still living at home, through assistance at home, social support, social networks, daytime activities, professional guidance etc.?
What can be done to change our perception of people living with dementia (young and old) so that we start seeing them as people that can still play a role in our society despite their illness?
How can we change the dementia stigma and see the people behind the illness? If we raise awareness around the illness as a society, people with early onset dementia may be able to keep their job longer, participate in activities, etc. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:              
1. Understand the challenges that face YD people and their loved ones
2. Learn about the qualities and building blocks of a more generative space for YD people, their families and staff at home, in the community and while living at a healthcare provider organization.
3. Understand the changing role and responsibilities of the community and the healthcare providers in order to create a more generative space.
4. Explore further possibilities to create a more generative space for YD people, their families, and staff in our communities.

ROOM 329

10/1/2014  |  4:15 PM - 5:15 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G08: Extending ‘Behavioral Health Environments’: A New Collaborative Conversation to Explore How We Can Build a More Healthy World Together

SPEAKERS
 
Heather Fennimore
President, Global Healthcare, Humanscale
 
Fiona de Vos PhD
Owner, Studio dVO
 
Jessica Gutierrez-Rodriguez
Assistant Superintendent, Texas Department of State Health Services
 
BJ Miller, FASID, CCIM
President, The Vision Group Studios, LLC
 
Francis Murdock Pitts FACHA, FAIA, OAA
President, architecture+
 
Mardelle McCuskey Shepley, D.Arch., FAIA, FACHA, EDAC, LEED AP
Professor and Director, Center for Health Systems & Design at Texas A&M University

‘Behavioral health’ care environments seem to be a new euphemism for what used-to-be called Psychiatric Care Facilities, Mental Health Facilities, and/or Dementia Care Facilities.  However, if we consider that all health and healthcare environments – whether they be hospitals, doctors’ offices, schools, workplaces, communities – can benefit from improved individual responsibility for personal behavior (for example – improved personal responsibility for behavior could increase rates of medical compliance in all medical settings, reduce drug and alcohol abuse, reduce incidents of infection, and even deliver more caring healthcare) then we might begin thinking more systemically about how we can more effectively improve health with innovative design of the environment.

This presentation will be a highly participatory and interactive session where the entire group of assembled presenters and attendees will explore this possibility and determine its own conclusion – and possible next steps.  The presentation will be moderated and provoked by individuals who have both specific expertise in ‘behavioral health environments’ and generative space.

The moderator will introduce and manage the discussion, and each of the expert panelists will briefly present their own personal point of view.  Attendees will then have the opportunity to engage with the experts in a lively ‘collaborative conversation’ to explore new design possibilities.  All are welcome to participate and all points of view are actively encouraged.  This is ‘the place to be’ if you are planning to lead the future of health and design…..

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: 
1.  Learn new approaches to improving health with design of the environment
2.  Develop new understandings of how to design behavioral health environments    
3.  Participate in a experiment in cultivating a more generative learning space 
4. Identify potentially new collaborative opportunities             
    

SESSION FOCUS AREAS: = American Society of Interior Designers = Generative Space